University Honors Program Seminar/Course Syllabi  

Fall 2014

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FOUNDATIONS OF WRITTEN COMMUNICATION


ENC 1930 LAUGHING MATTERS: COMEDY AS COMMENTARY      96728          T/R                4:00 – 5:20 PM             CU 123

Substitutes for Foundations of Written Communication (ENC 1102); meets both Gordon Rule writing requirement and WAC (Writing across the Curriculum) requirements.

Dr. Julia L. Mason, Department of English

People have long used comedy as a means of social criticism, employing humor to make arguments about the world around them. But what makes something funny? What makes something an argument? How is humor used to make effective arguments?

To answer to these questions, we will use a rhetorical approach to explore the intersections of comedy and argumentation. Using classic rhetorical concepts, theories of humor, and critical approaches to comedy, we will examine arguments in a variety of comedic genres, including stand-up, film, drama, sitcom, political satire, and parody. We will investigate what makes something funny, how humor effects argument, and what makes comedic arguments effective (or ineffective, as the case may be), by asking questions about the role of comedy in social criticism about culture, race, gender, and class.

After reading notable historical works (including Aristophanes and Jonathan Swift), students will be asked to read/watch works by contemporary humorists and comics including George Carlin, Dave Chappelle, Kevin Hart, Bill Hicks, Marc Maron, and Chris Rock, as well as films and television programs such as Family Guy and Saturday Night Live.

This course will not only ask students to analyze humor, but more importantly, it will ask students to make their own arguments about comedy’s purpose, effectiveness, and use as social criticism.

 

FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE & THE NATURAL WORLD

CLASSES NOT OFFERED THIS SEMESTER


FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS & QUANTITATIVE REASONING

CLASSES NOT OFFERED THIS SEMESTER

 

FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIETY & HUMAN BEHAVIOR

 

PSY 1930 HONORS GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY                                  97345        T/R    9:30 – 10:50 AM         BU 112

Substitutes for Foundations of Society & Human Behavior; meets both Gordon Rule writing requirement and WAC (Writing across the Curriculum) requirements.

Dr. Krystal Mize, Instructor, Department of Psychology

The purpose of this course is to provide you with a broad survey of the field of psychology. In successfully completing this course, you will demonstrate your knowledge about what is and is not currently known about the physiological, behavioral, cognitive, social, and emotional basis of human and non-human behavior. Moreover, you will be able to distinguish among a variety of theoretical explanations for behavior, critically examine the differing research methodologies used to investigate psychological questions, and apply psychological principles to real-world settings. It is my hope that by the end of the term you will learn what it means to observe behavior and to think critically and objectively about behavioral phenomena and the “human experience”.

 

FOUNDATIONS OF GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

ANT 1930 AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE  97043 T/R   2:00 – 3:20 PM   AH 204

Substitutes for Foundations in Global Citizenship/ GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ; meets both Gordon Rule writing requirement and WAC (Writing across the Curriculum) requirements.

Dr. Michael Harris, Department of Anthropology

Anthropological insights into such domains of human life as childhood, play, biological needs, gender roles, social structure, family and kinship, economic organization, ritual, and religion are ordinarily taught in relation to non-western or non-North American cultures. In this course, you will conduct an examination of other cultures through the usual texts, while concurrently writing your own cultural life history. Each student will create and present her/his own anthropological autobiography in a series of structured weekly writings that are contextualized by understandings of other cultural groups' practices.

 

EUH 4140 RENAISSANCE EUROPE (1350-1500)                                   96747   M/W       2:00 – 3:20 PM     AH105

Substitutes for Foundations in Global Citizenship

Dr. Benno P. Lowe, Department of History

A historical examination of the Renaissance as a cultural flowering first in Italy and then the rest of Europe. Our course will look at European art, literature, religion, politics, economics and cross cultural exchanges with new worlds, areas that continue to influence our notion of global citizenship to this day.

 

INR 3403 HONORS INTERNATIONAL LAW FOUNDATIONS & INSTITUTIONS      91037 M/W/F 1:00 – 1:50 PM  SO 390

Substitutes for Foundations in Global Citizenship/ GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Dr. Jeffrey S. Morton, Department of Political Science

International Law Foundations & Institutions provides an in depth review and analysis of the major jurisprudence and institutional features of modern international law. The course explores the relationship between the principal actors in world politics (nation-states, international organizations, sub-state actors) and prevailing international law. The manner by which international law is created, modified and applied is examined, along with the violation of international law and its consequences. There are no pre-requisites or co-requisites for this course.

FOUNDATIONS OF CREATIVE EXPRESSION

 

ARH 1930 ART APPRECIATION                                                          95888   T/R     11:00 AM – 12: 20 PM            AH 204

Substitutes forFoundations of Creative Expressions; meets both Gordon Rule writing requirement and WAC (Writing across the Curriculum) requirements.

Dr. Karen J. Leader, Department of Visual Art & Arts History

A one-semester survey of major periods and personalities in the History of Art from earliest times in the Paleolithic period to contemporary art-making. Attention will be given not simply to formal characteristics of art but also to the historical context in which it was produced and major theories that art historians use today in order to interpret its development. Writing assignments will give students the opportunity to exercise their powers of observation and use of language and to explore their own responses to visual material and its meaning.

 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE

CHECK COURSE LISTINGS THROUGH DEPARTMENTAL COURSE SCHEDULE IN MYFAU

FOR UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION

AS OF: 4-28-14

   
   

 

 Last Modified 4/29/14