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Research Day Symposium 2007

 

The Wilkes Honors College Symposium for Research and Creative Projects

Archive for 2007

Talk Abstracts

 

Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College Symposium for Research and Creative Projects

2007 Posters

Poster Abstracts

Chardiera Bonaby, Stacee L. Caplan, Samantha C. Chong, Malwina A. Huzarska, Don K. Pham, Dr. Eugene Smith, Dr. Chitra Chandrasekhar
Arson Analysis by Static Head Space Enrichment and Gas Chromatography using Simplex Optimization
Advisor: Dr. Eugene Smith

Petroleum distillates used as accelerants for arson were analyzed by static headspace enrichment and gas chromatography.  The conditions used for headspace enrichment (e.g. time & temperature) are known to influence the extracted hydrocarbon distribution.  Simplex optimization was used to determine the optimal extraction conditions to minimize experimental artifacts.  Both optimal enrichment times & temperatures were determined to be significantly lower than those currently used.

Kristen Bunting
Current Sentiments of Pearl Harbor Survivors toward the Japanese
Advisor: Dr. Pat Liehr, Dr. James Wetterer

To date there has been an overwhelming amount of quantitative research concerning veterans; however, very little qualitative research exists on the topic.  The purpose of my thesis is to qualitatively analyze interviews I conducted with Pearl Harbor survivors in 2006 in order to determine their sentiments toward the Japanese 65 years after the aggressive event took place.  The interviews were conducted using story middle-range theory (Smith & Liehr 2003) and then analyzed using an adaptation of conventional content analysis (Hsieh 2005).  This research is helpful because it provides qualitative research on veterans’ emotions that is practically non-existent.  It also aids in understanding why Pearl Harbor survivors are either able or unable to forgive their Japanese aggressors 65 years later

Christian Canache, Dr. Jon Moore
Assessment of Fish Biodiversity on New England Seamounts
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

Very little was known about fish biodiversity on the New England Seamount chain until recently. In late 2000, three hundred fish and invertebrate species were found on Bear Seamount by the NOAA R/V “Delaware II”.  Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution conducted two cruises to explore the New England Seamount chain in 2003. I will be assessing fish species throughout Alvin submersible dives during these cruises. Footage  will be converted to photographs using the Macintosh movie program. Fishes will be identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level using keys and literature. The habitat, depth and behavior will also be compared to the literature available. Geographical distribution of the species will also be taken into consideration; Moore et al. (2004) suggests seamounts serve as dispersal corridors, or rather “stepping-stones” from one side of the Atlantic to the other, that may be used by non-native species to gain access to potentially new habitat.

Jennifer Cohen,  Amanda Kennedy, Selale Kozanli, Kathleen Schindler, Jessica Rios, Joel Simundich
TRANSformation
Advisor: Dr. Warimu Njambi

Based on critical feminist, race, and queer perspectives of theorists and science fiction writers such as Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, Derrick Bell, George Schuyler, Samuel R. Delany, Uppinder Mehan, Shree Thomas, among others, TRANSformation is a postcolonial narrative that aims to deconstruct reductionist and deterministic gendered, racialized, and sexed bodies.  The main character, a “shapeshifter,” problematizes the existing racial, gender, class and sexual systems through the alternating narrative voices of marginalized others (who are also shapeshifters). Set locally, the story enmeshes itself in the problems of culture readily apparent in the predominantly white and heterosexual “suburb” of Jupiter, Florida. TRANSformation is a collective narrative that materialized at the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, in Feminism, Race, Queer, and Science Fiction class during Spring Semester of 2007.

Glenn Coldren, Edward Proffitt
Influences of Mosquito Control Impoundments on Rhizophora mangle initial propagule establishment and growth
Advisor: Dr. William O’Brien

Rotational Impoundment Management (RIM) is a commonly used method of mosquito control in Florida involving seasonal flooding during mosquito breeding season and allowances for natural tidal variations during summer flooding.  My study looks at the effects of this impoundment strategy on the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., recruitment.  Primary productivity of mangroves in these impoundments has been found to be similar to that of natural areas, although nutrient levels have been found to differ greatly.  R. mangle is a completely viviparous species and as such maternal conditions have a strong effect on propagules.  My study compares the initial establishment and growth of R. mangle propagules collected from and planted in both impounded and non-impounded sites.

Vincent Del Signore
Effects of Reduction Mowing on the Distribution of Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus)
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is endemic to the Southeast US, where its populations are declining primarily due to habitat degradation. Gopher tortoises prefer habitats with open sunny spots for nesting and basking. Fire is a normal element in gopher tortoise habitat, and when natural fires are suppressed, habitats may become too overgrown by vegetation. To maintain the open spaces, some land managers use reduction mowing to regulate overgrowth. I studied gopher tortoises in the Abacoa Greenway reserve, established to protect the tortoises in a residential area of Jupiter, Florida, to examine how reduction mowing influences tortoise activity.

Alicia DeCicco, Dr. Patricia Liehr
Real-time Measurement Words, Blood Pressure, and Feelings during Everyday College Life
Advisor: Dr. Patricia Liehr and Dr. Paul Kirchman

This research gathered information about blood pressure (BP), feelings, and word use during the course of everyday college life using real-time data collection. An ambulatory BP recorder, PocketEar recording software on a Personalized Digital Assistant (PDA), and a paper and pencil diary were used to collect this data. The PocketEar records words, which were analyzed in conjunction with ambulatory blood pressure and diary entries to offer a view of health indicators and feelings experienced in everyday college life. Also, we assessed the capability of the PocketEAR device as a mobile data collector worn by the subject. This study involves procedures replicating Dr. Patricia Liehr's "Connecting With Others in the Midst of Stressful Upheaval on September 11, 2001," a study which included the use of the real-time data collection devices discussed.

Carrie Goethel
Effects of Prescribed Burning on Native and Exotic Herpetofauna in Florida Pine Flatwoods
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

Florida’s pine flatwoods are pyrogenic ecosystems that require fire every four to seven years.  These burns initiate the regeneration of the herbaceous layer and suppress crowding vegetation, important features to many species in the community.  Human development has hindered these natural fires and consequently affected the herpetofaunal (reptile and amphibian) species found in the area.  Prescribed burning is one management technique used to imitate natural fires and maintain the characteristics of pine flatwoods in Savannas Preserve State Park.  Anthropogenic encroachment, in addition to fire suppression, has also provided ideal habitats for invasive species to establish themselves within native environments.  Non-native species are often found in developed areas around buildings and roads, and it is likely that this pattern continues into the park.  This eight-month coverboard survey focuses on the effect various fires may have on herpetofauna in the area and explores the level of intrusion exotic species exhibit within the communities.

Meghan Jameson, Dr. Jon Moore
Niche Adjustment of the Brown Anoles after the Introduction of the Curlytail Lizard
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

Abstract: The effects of the recently introduced species, the Curlytail Lizard, on the Florida ecosystem are relatively unknown. Previous research conducted in the Bahamas showed that Brown Anole Lizards, once introduced to Curlytail Lizards, became arboreal to evade the threat of the Curlytail Lizards. To attempt to see if such a niche shift in the Brown Anole population is occurring in Florida, data was collected using two areas located on the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College campus. One area was inhabited by only Brown Anoles whereas the other area was inhabited by Brown Anoles and Curlytail Lizards. Observations were made by walking through the selected area, and counting and recording all lizards that were visible. Data was collected at specific times during the day, four times a day. After comparing the two locations, it was found that the Brown Anoles had become arboreal while sharing an environment with Curlytail Lizards.

Walter Jean-Vertus, Dr. Eugene Smith
An Analysis of Gold in Seawater Using Ion Exchange Chromatography and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Advisor: Dr. Eugene Smith

Gold is a highly prized metal whose ore deposits are continually being mined and depleted. With the increasing scarcity of continental gold ores, gold miners and scientist are turning to the sea as one alternate source of this precious metal. But the problem arises in determining which parts of the ocean to mine. Ideally the area with the greatest concentration of gold would be the best place to start but determining an accurate concentration of gold in a sample of seawater is difficult for various reasons. One is gold’s extreme dilute concentration in seawater averaging at about 13 parts per trillion. This study deals with detecting trace amounts of gold in seawater.  The first step in the analysis involves pre-concentrating gold in seawater using an ion exchange resin, Chelex® -100 and optimizing the experimental conditions.  Then the chromatographic fractions are analyzed using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer.  The results from several trials will be presented.

Carolyn Kulb, Samantha Montgomery, Jarred Reiling
Scientific Racism and Forced Sterilization
Advisor: Dr. Warimũ Njambi

Western societies historically have often used science and medicine to institutionalize white supremacy and abuse non-white and non-Western bodies through various means. This presentation will examine theories of Social Darwinism and eugenics, as well as how scientific racism has lent legitimacy to racist ideologies that have influenced how reproductive technologies are constructed. These technologies are based on “ideal” bodies, and in several notable instances, have been used to punish bodies that do not fit the ideal. In the U.S., non-ideal bodies have undergone medical experiments, genocide, extermination, forced abortion, and forced sterilization based on theories of scientific racism. This presentation will focus on secret forced sterilization in America, which has quietly and systematically abused Black women for almost a century. As a result, new reproductive and medical technologies continue to be questioned by poor Blacks across the nation.

Andrea Lopez, Danielle Boutte
Effects of Mugshot Viewing on Memory for Events
Advisor: Dr. Julie Earles, Dr. Alan Kersten

Juries often rely heavily on eyewitness testimonies, which unfortunately are not very accurate. By showing participants short video clips of people performing simple actions followed by still photographs, much like mug shots, we show how people commonly report an incorrect, yet familiar person as having performed an action that was actually performed by someone else. Participants are asked to identify if a person in a picture performed a certain action and then which (if any) of two people performed a particular action. One week after the initial viewing, participants remembered events fairly accurately, yet made errors by commonly identifying a person from a photograph instead of the actor from the original video. These errors were based on the familiarity of viewing the photographs more than the videos. Therefore, showing a witness a line-up or a book of mug shots may increase familiarity and lead to false identification of a suspect.

Michael  Mallen
Differential Functionality of Microtubule Binding Motifs in the p150glued Subunit of Dynactin
Advisor: Dr. Nicholas Quintyne

My study focuses on the multi-protein complex dynactin in mammalian cells. Dynactin is important for numerous cellular processes, acting as a required cofactor for the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein. Dynactin consists of ten different polypeptides, the largest of which is p150Glued. This subunit is responsible for the dynactin-microtubule interaction, which occurs via two different binding motifs.  For my study, the binding characteristics of these domains, alone or in tandem, were analyzed in cells by quantifying the effects of overexpression on various dynactin-based processes. This study will allow us to better understand regulation of dynein-dynactin function in the cell.

Heather  Marchetti
The Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Advisor: Dr. Eugene Smith

In past forensic investigations, latent fingerprint analysis used the array of ridges in a person’s fingerprint to successfully identify the individual. This method is viable because each person’s fingerprint is unique due to the fact that no two ridge arrangements are exactly the same. However, problems arose because fingerprints at crime scenes are sometimes smeared or incomplete. In cases where these problems exist, the analysis of the ridges is an impractical method of identification. Researchers made advancements in the techniques of latent fingerprint analysis, with the resources from the ever progressing technology industry, to account for these problems. One such development includes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to establish the chemical composition of a latent fingerprint and to determine whether the differences in its chemical makeup can establish things such as age and gender. In this study, the variability of chemical composition of finger prints with time was examined.

Paul McCurdy, Gaie Alling, Orla Doherty, Dr. James Wetterer
Declining Coral Health and Fish Diversity in the South Pacific
Advisor: Dr. James Wetterer

Coral reefs are complex ecosystems that harbor an estimated 1-9 million species worldwide, including 30% of all marine fish species. Over-fishing, pollution, and global warming are degrading coral reef environments, and the health of scleractinian corals worldwide is declining. I examined the relationship between coral health and fish diversity in several locations throughout the South Pacific. Replicated surveys of reef transects in the Solomon Islands in 2000, 2002, and 2006, indicate that several measures of coral health and fish diversity have declined though this time period. To protect biodiversity, these declines must be halted.

Kelley McKee, Dr. Jon Moore
An Illustrated Guide to the Abacoa Greenway
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

The Abacoa community enjoys the unique social, economic, environmental, and aesthetic benefits of a 259-acre greenway system. For my thesis I am writing an informational overview of the greenway preserve and illustrating select flora and fauna species to contribute to a guide for the Abacoa Greenway. My research essay will discuss the various features of the guide and examine the social and environmental components of the greenway. The guide will include: an introduction and overview of the greenway; a map of the various tracts; a checklist of endemic flora and fauna species with coinciding chart of annual presence; and illustrations of selected species with captions. The introduction and overview will summarize the planning and land-use history of the area, the social and environmental significance of greenways, as well as the ecology of pine flatwood and wetland ecosystems. The finished product will function as an educational guide to the Abacoa Greenway.

Samuel Michel
Analysis of Dynein Interaction in Preventing Cell Multipolarity
Advisor: Dr. Nicholas Quintyne

During mitosis, centrosomes act as microtubule organizing centers creating a bipolar spindle to ensure equal partitioning of the genome to the daughter cells. Because of the critical role of the centrosomes in regulating chromosome segregatation, amplification can lead to the formation of multipolar spindles with the extra-centrosomes working as additional microtubule organizers. Such defects can lead to aneuploidy and setup an environment favorable to tumorigenesis. Centrosome amplification has been seen in numerous high-grade cancers. However, recent studies have shown that some cells can prevent multipolarity by clustering extra centrosomes into compound microtubule organizing centers. To better understand the mechanisms involved in this clustering, we induced centrosomal amplification in a non-cancer cell line by treatments with microtubule depolarizing drugs. After treatment, the pattern of centrosome clustering was examined using fluorescent live cell imaging in addition to fixed cell analysis using antibodies to the microtubules and centrosomes.

Don Pham
The Addiction in Anxiety
Advisor: Dr. Paul Kenny, The Scripps Research Institute

The general direction of scientific evidence implicates anxiety to be involved in addiction, though mechanistically the relationship remains unknown. The specific role it plays, the strength of its influence on addictive thoughts and behaviors, and even its effects on positive reinforcement are all still heavily debated and far from definitive. For example, current theories conjecture that the relief of heightened anxiety is a driving force in drug seeking behavior, yet not all the evidence is convincing of that notion. Answering these questions will allow researchers a significant advantage in understanding, treating, and possibly one day curing addiction. Using an interdisciplinary approach on the cutting edge of animal research, these previous and ongoing studies attempt to gain insight into the neurobiochemical relationship between anxiety and addiction.

Don  Pham, Chardiera Bonaby, Stacee Caplan, Samantha Chong, Malwina Huzarska, Jasmine Nguyen, Jenny Santos
Chemical Analysis of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Advisor: Dr. Eugene Smith

The phenomenon that each individual’s fingerprint is unique, with the exception of identical twins, has been known for centuries. Forensic scientists utilize this fact in linking individuals to crime scenes.  However, problems arise because latent fingerprints at crime scenes are sometimes smeared or incomplete. This study involves testing the notion that an individual’s body oils contain chemicals in relative amounts that compound to form a distinctive pattern exclusive to that individual.  Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is ideally suited for determining these distinctive patterns, and this technique was used to analyze multiple skin oil samples. The results suggest an individual’s body oils may be useful in forensic profiling. With this methodology, it is plausible that the differences in the chemical makeup of fingerprints can establish things such as age and gender and thus reduce a suspect group.

Maria  Rodriguez
Optimization of pretreatment techniques in the detection of phosphorous oxyanions by ion chromatography
Advisor: Dr. Michelle Ivey

The role of phosphorus in many organic compounds is essential for the existence of life on Earth. Naturally occurring inorganic phosphorus can be found in six oxidation states: -III, -I, 0, +I, +III, and +V, the last one being the most stable and common form in the environment. Previous studies indicate that certain bacteria can metabolize the more reduced forms of inorganic phosphorus oxyanions, including hypophosphite, phosphite, and phosphate.  Ivey et al (2005) optimized the ion chromatography limits of detection (LOD) for these oxyanions in synthetic geothermal water and found that the amount of phosphorous oxyanions removed from the sample by use of filtering cartridges was dependant upon the total concentration of ions in solution. The purpose of this study is to improve the phosphorous oxyanion LOD by analyzing the relationship between several filtering techniques, variation of injection loop sizes, gradient, and the effective concentration of phosphate oxy anions in a synthetic geothermal matrix.

Kathryn Smith, Lorien DeBruyn, David Martin, Kyle Ashby
The Technology of Motherhood and Fatherhood
Advisor: Dr. Wairimu Njambi

The patriarchal nuclear family is an ideal often defended with biological and social determinism: if women are the only sex who can bear children, then they are inherently responsible for them; additionally, since women have this ability to give birth, they will necessarily feel “maternal instincts.”  These fundamental assumptions about reproduction and family, however, are vehemently challenged by recent reproductive technologies, most notably Artificial Insemination (AI), surrogate pregnancy, and the possibility of male pregnancy.  This presentation will show how these technologies cause us to explore the allocation of responsibilities to mothers and fathers.  Moreover, this presentation will discuss how changes in reproductive technology prompt a reinvestigation and redefinition of what it means to be a parent.  The scientific studies and technologies which have for so long reinforced hegemony are in fact now proving that motherhood and fatherhood are constructed entities – that technology and parenting, in essence, make each other.

Theresa E. Smith
Territory Size of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) at Savannas Preserve State Park
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

The Florida Scrub-jay is the only bird endemic to the state of Florida, and is entirely restricted to pyrogenic xeric oak scrublands. The species is listed as Threatened, and all populations throughout the state are in decline. The major causes of decline is habitat modification due to development and fire suppression. Preservation and proper fire management is crucial for the continued survival of the species. The territories of three families of Florida Scrub-jays at Savannas Preserve State Park were delineated, and the area calculated using 100% MVCP analysis and compared to work previously published by Cowan (2005). The results of this study show that Savannas Preserve State Park oak scrub habitat is rapidly deteriorating, but that aggressive fire management can restore the scrub to optimal Florida Scrub-jay habitat.

Peter Steele
Memory for Events: When does distraction make a difference?
Advisor: Julie Earles

Eyewitness testimony can make or break a court case and is taken into account by jurors much more heavily than circumstantial evidence (Loftus 1988).  What this study attempted to assess was the degree of accuracy of eyewitness testimony, particularly of two different groups, college-age students and older adults.  In this experiment, both groups viewed a series of video clips of female actors performing simple actions.  After a three week gap for college students and a one week gap for older adults, both groups returned to view another series of video clips and were asked if they saw each actor/action pair the previous session.  The college students were also distracted either while initially watching the videos or while remembering if they had seen them.  Older adult data are still being gathered, but they are hypothesized to test similarly to college students being distracted while watching the videos for the first time.

Tara Sycz, Peter Steele
Memory and Aging: Familiar Actor Photos
Advisor: Dr. Julie Earles, Dr. Alan Kersten

Older adults have been shown to have a decreased ability to remember associations of actors and actions. After initially viewing videos of an actor completing an action will the presentation of photos of familiar actors help them to later recall the association between actor and action? We tested this by presenting the older adults with a set of events and later showing them photographs of some of the actors they are familiar with. The older adults were then asked to remember which actor performed which action one week later. Data for younger adults shows that they are better able to remember associations between the actor and the action after viewing photos of actors they are familiar with. We predicted that this effect would magnify for older adults. The familiarity gained through exposure should help the older adults to accurately remember which actors performed which actions.

Andrea Thomasson
Demographics of Gopher Tortoises (gopherus polyphemus) affected with Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in a South Florida Community
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) is a serious illness that has affected several Gopher Tortoise populations; here in the Abacoa Greenway, Jupiter FL. This debilitating disease is very contagious and results in runny nose, lethargy, watery eyes, anorexia, and even death among this protected species. For this study, several gopher tortoises were tested for the antibody present in the blood if the tortoise is a carrier of  the mycoplasma agassazii, which is known to cause URTD. These results were then compared to that of a previous study, and it was determined if URTD has become a larger epidemic within this particular population, or if the tortoises have found a way to “cure” themselves of this disease- indicated by previously sick tortoises’ now testing negative for the antibody.   

Kathryn  Tiling, C. Edward Proffitt, Ph. D.
The effects of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and artificial shading on the seagrass Halodule wrightii
Advisor: Dr. Jon Moore

Extensive blooms of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula occurred during 2006 in Halodule wrightii seagrass beds. We examined the effects of L. majuscula blooms on seagrass, by removal treatments and assessed if this was primarily an effect of shading by conducting artificial shade treatments. We tested the effects of L. majuscula removal and artificial shading on fifty individual 0.25 m2 experimental seagrass plots infested with L. majuscula in a fully crossed two-way experiment.  Measurements included blade elongation, biomass, and stem density. Blade lengths of H. wrightii were significantly increased by the presence of artificial shading and L. majuscula.  L. majuscula removal resulted in increased below-ground biomass in shaded plots, suggesting an increase in stores, when possible, for accelerated recovery following a shading event.  Adverse L. majuscula effects occurred after declines in bloom biomass indicating that L. majuscula can have a prolonged negative effect on H. wrightii production.

Jennifer Wiseman, Dani Boutte
Memory for Observed Events: Actor and Action Frequency
Advisor: Dr. Julie Earles, Dr. Alan Kersten

Eyewitness testimony can be influenced by an increase in frequency of exposure to a stimulus at encoding. Younger and older adults saw video clips of events. An increase in repetition of events led to an increase in the number of Yes responses to both old events and to conjunction events during a recognition task. A conjunction event is one where a previously shown actor is shown performing an action that was previously performed by someone else. The increased familiarity that occurs when the frequency of an event is increased at encoding may be responsible for this increase in incorrect yes responses to the conjunction items. Older adult data are still being gathered and analyzed, but they are expected to follow a similar pattern.

Rachel Zech
Human mate selection: phenotype-matching for birth order
Advisor: Dr. James Wetterer

Many animal species show phenotype matching in mate selection, preferentially pairing with individuals with similar traits. Humans show phenotype matching for a wide range of physical and psychological features. I examined phenotype matching in human mate-choice for birth order, a completely non-genetic feature. I also tested whether this matching may result, at least in part, from the disproportionate failure of non-matched pairs. I surveyed 500 individuals who were part of a couple (married, unmarried, and divorced), and found statistically significant phenotype matching for birth order. This finding is especially interesting because the primary proximate cause of phenotype matching in humans is thought to be attraction to people possessing traits similar to those of one's siblings. Birth order of one's siblings, however, is necessarily mismatched (except for twins). My results help further our understanding of human behavior.

Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College Symposium for Research and Creative Projects

2007 Program

8:00 – 9:00 Registration – AD Lobby
Student Presentations
  AD 102 AD 103 AD 104 AD 202 AD 206
9:00-9:15 Randi Gingerich
Economic Terms in Paradise Lost
Karen Ramm
An Examination of the Physical and Psychological Aspects of Acute and Chronic Pain Experiences
Marie Barreto
Membrane permeability of scaffold peptides for potential use in orally administered anti-HIV drugs

Laura Owens
The Determination of Sites of Regulation for Degradation of the Weel Protein through a Random Mutagenesis Screen

Rachel Evans
Ego Development and Hypocrisy: Rationale and Evidence for a Curvilinear Model
9:15 – 9:30 Victoria Ryan
Childbirth and Creation in Milton's Paradise Lost: Sin and Eve as Dociles Bodies
Christine Hopson
Fall From Grace: The Rise of Secularism and the 1773 Suppression of the Society of Jesus
Kimber Kingsland
Assemblage Dynamics of Exotic Herptiles on Campus
Elizabeth Jermone
Studies of Homodimerization in the Core Protein of Hepatitis C Virus
Angela Carter
On Social Connectedness: The Effects of Group and Film on Positive Affect and Self Esteem
9:30 – 9:45 James Capp
From Sleeping Serpent to an Enemy of Humankind: The Transformation of Milton's Serpents
Patricia Hernandez
The Voice of Society
Jeffery Van Treese
Permit Trading and its Application to Greenhouse Gas Emission Abatement
Rachel Guillaume
Using Yeast as a Model of Diabetes: Testing the Effects of Glyoxalase Mutants
Garreth Rosenzweig
From Mortality to Connectedness: An Experimental Study of Affiliativeness, Punitiveness, and Mood
9:45 – 10:00 Kathryn Cruikshank
"Merely to Officate Light": The Formation of God the Son as a Docile Body in Paradise Lost
Maria Hall
The Search for Meaning in the Face of Impermanence: Movement and Meaning in Woolf
Jamie Harris
Regression Analysis of a Small Business to Determine Optimal Advertising Medium
Paul McCurdy
Declining Coral Health and Fish Diversity in the South Pacific
Stephanie Franz
Watching a life over time: the effects of viewing a videotaped longitudinal portrayal on cultural worldviews
10:00 - 10:15 Jenna Fitzgerald
Illuminations to Illustrations: the changing role of images as depicted by the Luttrell Psalter and A Curious Herbal
Amanda Kennedy
Postcolonial Feminist Body Studies
Linda Segovia
Modeling Simple Epidemics
Courtney Blair
Avifauna in an Urban Environment
Autumn Siegel
Online Role-Playing Games: a Survey of Legal Questions
10:15 - 10:30 Kathryn Smith
Inviting but Frustrating Over-Simplification: (Re) Reading Tess of the d'Urbervilles
Maureen Krupski
Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita and Media Voyeurs
Don Pham
The Addiction in Anxiety
Kristy McKee
Fishes of Savannas Preserve State Park
Jocelyn Sabbagh
Reframing the Debate on Migration and Gender: Understanding the Impact of Transnational Gossip on Women in Jacaltenango, Guatemala
Break
11:00 - 11:15 Derek McGrath
"Is the world then so narrow?": The simultaneous need for home and travel in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter
Lorin Page
Dress: Form, Content, and Movement in Carlyle's Sartor Resartus
Malwina Huzarska
New highly-potent inhibitors of insulin-degradin enzyme (IDE)
Melody Strattan
Breeding Season and Fecundity of Gopherus polyphemus in South Florida
Savannah McClelland
Iconography and Ethnogenesis: Making a Discrete Ethnic Group of The South
11:15 - 11:30 Eric Seymour
Reconstruction: Photography and History in E. L. Doctorow's The March
Angie Vyas
The Cultural Defense as a Partial Excuse
Gabriel Kassel
Community Supported Agriculture: Economic Viability and Social Use
Theresa Smith
Territory Size of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) at Savannas Preserve State Park
Misty Hudelson
The Moral Personality: Traits, Virtues, Emotions, and Ego Level

11:30 - 11:45

Joel Simundich
Invisible Cartography
Selena Kogan
Should there be a cultural defense?
Yuliy Fedoryshyn
Internal Migration of Elderly Populations
Stephanie Sabshin
Fluctuating Craniodental Asymmetry in the southern African cheetah Acinonyx jubatus
 

11:45 - 12:00

 

Abigail Williams
What Was "Behind the Green Door"?: Reclaiming Feminity and Sexual Pleasure within Pornography
       
Lunch
1:00 – 2:00 Honors College Forum, AD Auditorium
Dr. Christopher Strain, Honors College, FAU
"Holy Smoke: Church Arson in the United States"
2:00 - 4:30
Poster Sessions, HC Building, and Reception, HC Atrium
Chardiera Bonaby, Stacee L. Caplan, Samantha C. Chong, Malwina A. Huzarska, Don K. Pham, Dr. Eugene Smith, Chitra Chandrasekhar, Ph. D.
Arson Analysis by Static Head Space Enrichment and Gas Chromatography using Simplex Optimization
Paul McCurdy, Abigail Alling, Orla Doherty, James Wetterer, Ph.D.
Declining Coral Health and Fish Diversity in the South Pacific
Kristen Bunting
Current Sentiments of Pearl Harbor Survivors toward the Japanese
Kelley McKee, Jon Moore, Ph. D.
An Illustrated Guide to the Abacoa Greenway
Christian Canache, Jon Moore, Ph.D.
Assessment of Fish Biodiversity on New England Seamounts
Samuel Michel
Analysis of Dynein Interaction in Preventing Cell Multipolarity
Jennifer Cohen, Amanda Kennedy, Selale Kozanli, Jessica Rios, Kathleen Schindler, Joel Simundich, Wairìmú Njambi, Ph.D.
TRANSformations
Don Pham, Paul J. Kenny, Ph.D.
The Addiction in Anxiety
Glenn Coldren, Edward Proffitt, Ph. D.
Influences of Mosquito Control Impoundments on Rhizophora mangle initial propagule establishment and growth
Don Pham, Chardiera Bonaby, Stacee Caplan, Samantha Chong, Malwina Huzarska, Jasmine Nguyen, Jenny Santos
Chemical Analysis of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Vincent Del Signore, Jon Moore, Ph.D.
Effects of Reduction Mowing on the Distribution of Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus)
Maria C. Rodriguez, Michelle Ivey, Ph.D.
Optimization of pretreatment techniques in the detection of phosphorous oxyanions by ion chromatography
Alicia DeCicco, Patricia Liehr, Ph.D.
Real-time Measurement Words, Blood Pressure, and Feelings during Everyday College Life
Kathryn Smith, Lorien DeBruyn, David Martin, Kyle Ashby, Wairìmú Njambi, Ph.D.
The Technology of Motherhood and Fatherhood
Carrie A. Goethel
Effects of Prescribed Burning on Native and Exotic Herpetofauna in Florida Pine Flatwoods
Theresa E. Smith
Territory Size of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) at Savannas Preserve State Park
Meghan Jameson, Jon Moore, Ph. D.
Niche Adjustment of the Brown Anoles after the Introduction of the Curlytail Lizard
Peter Steele, Julie L. Earles, Ph.D., Alan W. Kersten, Ph.D.
Memory for Events: Distraction
Walter Jean-Vertus, Eugene Smith, Ph. D.
An Analysis of Gold in Seawater Using Ion Exchange Chromatography and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Tara Sycz, Peter Steele, Julie L. Earles, Ph.D., Alan W. Kersten, Ph.D.
Memory and Aging: Familiar Actor Photos
Carolyn Kulb, Samantha Montgomery, Jarred Reiling, Wairìmú Njambi, Ph.D.
Scientific Racism and Forced Sterilization
Andrea Thomasson, Jon Moore, Ph.D.
Demographics of Gopher Tortoises (gopherus polyphemus) affected with Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in a South Florida Community
Andrea Lopez, Danielle Boutte, Julie L. Earles, Ph.D., Alan W. Kersten, Ph.D.
Effects of Mugshot Viewing on Memory for Events
Kathryn Tiling, C. Edward Proffitt, Ph.D., Jon Moore, Ph.D.
The effects of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and artificial shading on the seagrass Halodule wrightii
Michael Mallen, Nicholas J. Quintyne, Ph.D.
Differential Functionality of Microtubule Binding Motifs in the p150glued Subunit of Dynactin
Jennifer Wiseman, Dani Boutté, Julie L. Earles, Ph.D., Alan W. Kersten, Ph.D.
Memory for Observed Events: Actor and Action Frequency
Heather Marchetti
The Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints Collects Over Time by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Rachel Zech, James Wetterer, Ph.D.
Human mate selection: phenotype-matching for birth order

Send comments to Michael Harrawood (mharrawo@fau.edu).

 
Last Modified 11/21/13