FAU Lifelong Learning Society, Jupiter
Ralph Nurnberger, Ph.D.
 

History


Ralph Nurnberger, Ph.D., is Professor of International Relations at Georgetown University, where he has taught since 1975. He was named Professor of the Year by the Graduate School of Liberal Studies in 2003 and he received another award in 2005 for 20 years of excellence in teaching. He currently teaches graduate seminars on the Arab-Israeli conflict. He has twice spoken at the FAU program in Boca, as well as on numerous occasions for the Middle East Society on the FAU Boca campus.

Dr. Nurnberger has served on the professional staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and has spent 30 years in government relations. He has also advised numerous congressional, senatorial and presidential campaigns on foreign policy issues, especially those related to the Middle East.

He served for more than eight years as a Legislative Liaison for the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) and was the first director of Builders for Peace. In this capacity, he dealt with international leaders, including Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, then-Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat.

The Roosevelt Administration and the Holocaust
Did the United States Do All that was Possible to Save Jews from Hitler’s Genocidal Policies?
Generously Sponsored by Myrna and David Leven.

One of the most politically-charged questions in American history has been what the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt did, or did not do, in response to the Holocaust. Major historians have debated whether FDR and his administration did enough to aid the imperiled Jews of Europe. Some claim that defeating Nazi Germany was the most significant goal of the administration and that the hard-fought victory ultimately saved the world from this totalitarian horror. Defenders of Roosevelt point to specific actions by his administration, especially by the War Refugee Board, that may have saved thousands of Jews. Defenders also credit FDR’s policies with preventing a German conquest of Egypt that could have led to the destruction of Jewish communities in Palestine and may well have doomed any future Jewish state in the Middle East. On the other hand, critics cite America’s refusal to bomb Auschwitz or other camps, as well as immigration policies that made it difficult for Jewish refugees to come to the United States. They point to the fate of the 937 German Jewish refugees on the ocean liner St. Louis who were turned away from Cuba and then Miami in May 1939 as a prime example of FDR’s callousness. In this talk, Dr. Nurnberger will review many of the rationales behind these decisions.

Lecture # F1W8
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Wednesday, November 5, 2014
  Time:9:45–11:15 a.m.
  Fee:$25/member; $35/non-member
How Denmark’s Jews Escaped the Nazis
Generously Sponsored by Myrna and David Leven.

This lecture will focus on the extraordinary story of how the Danish people banded together to save the Jews of Denmark from the Nazis. In 1943, while occupied by the Nazis, Denmark did something that no other country even attempted. The Danes anticipated that the Nazis planned to round up the entire Jewish population and deport them to concentration camps. The king, political leaders and ordinary civilians united in their response. Over the course of two weeks, the Danish people hid, protected and then smuggled out of the country 7,742 of the 8,200 Danish Jews. The Jews were able to escape to Sweden on ships, schooners, fishing boats and anything else that floated. This lecture will underscore the courage of both the Danish people and the Jews who were able to escape from the Nazis.

Lecture # F1W9
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Wednesday, November 19, 2014
  Time:9:45–11:15 a.m.
  Fee:$25/member; $35/non-member
Secret History of the Six-Day War
Generously Sponsored by Myrna and David Leven.

The problems afflicting Israelis and Palestinians today, as well as Israel’s relations with all of its neighbors, can be attributed directly to the events of May and June 1967 that led to the Six-Day War between Israel and all of her Arab neighbors with the exception of Lebanon. This program on the “Secret History of the Six-Day War” will cover the roots of that war as well as the fascinating series of events that led up to the fighting. Dr. Nurnberger’s talk will document the misleading information provided by the Soviets to Anwar Sadat, which then led to the perception that Israel was planning to attack Syria. It will detail Abba Eban’s secret mission to Washington to discuss the impending crisis and the reaction of the Johnson administration. It will cover Prime Minister Levi Eschkol’s barely coherent radio address to the Israeli public and then Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin’s near-mental breakdown during the days of crisis leading up to the war. It will analyze the behavior of Arab leaders including Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser and Jordanian King Hussein as they prepared for war and then how they reacted to defeat at the hands of Israel. As a result of the war, Israel more than tripled the size of its territory. United Nations Resolution 242 then set the stage for every peace proposal since 1967, including the negotiations currently underway seeking to resolve the core issues that are at the root of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Lecture # F1W0
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Wednesday, December 3, 2014
  Time:9:45–11:15 a.m.
  Fee:$25/member; $35/non-member
The Four Presidential Assassinations

Political assassinations have often altered the course of history: Julius Caesar; Czar Alexander II; Archduke Franz Ferdinand; Gandhi; Yitzak Rabin. Four American Presidents have been assassinated. Each of these murders, in their own way, dramatically changed the course of American history. While totally different, every one of these acts of murder is a fascinating story, including mysteries, conspiracy theories and unanswered questions.

This course will examine why and how John Wilkes Booth murdered Abraham Lincoln; Charles Guiteau shot James Garfield; Leon Czolgosz assassinated William McKinley; and Lee Harvey Oswald shot John Kennedy. We will discuss Booth’s original plans to kidnap Lincoln and then how he and his fellow conspirators then sought to murder Lincoln and other national leaders. Did Booth head the conspiracy to kill Lincoln or were “higher-ups” involved? How did he evade his pursuers for 12 days? How did Lincoln’s death change the projected course of post-Civil War Reconstruction and then undermine race relations in the U.S. for a century? Garfield was the youngest man, to date, elected as President. He was one of our most brilliant Presidents, a Civil War hero, and a renowned Congressman who had hoped to challenge the nation’s corrupt political establishment. He died months after being shot raising serious questions about his medical treatment. How did Theodore Roosevelt’s assumption of power after the death of McKinley truly thrust the nation into the 20th century? What has been learned about Kennedy’s assassination in 50 years since JFK? Is there any merit to any of the conspiracy theories?

Course # W4T2
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Tuesdays — February 10, 17, 24; March 3
  Time:9 – 10:30 a.m.
  Fee:$34/member; $54/non-member