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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

 


College for Design and Social Inquiry


This section of the 2011-2012 FAU University Catalog includes revisions approved after the catalog's publish date of March 3, 2011. Revisions appear in red.

Bachelor's Program Information

Combined Program Information

Master's Program Information

Doctoral Program Information

Certificate Programs

Schools
School of Architecture


School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

School of Public Administration

School of Social Work

School of Urban and Regional Planning

Link to Course Descriptions for the College for Design and Social Inquiry

Academic Mission
The College for Design and Social Inquiry is a unique configuration of professional programs addressing social justice, design, public policy and planning in and for communities. The College strives to develop solutions through the integration and synergy of diverse disciplines by building knowledge and testing theoretical frameworks. In doing so, the College prepares future leaders, scholars and innovators to advocate for solutions through action. Instructional outcomes prepare students for admission to professional schools in areas such as criminal justice, law, public administration, social work and urban and regional planning and a variety of positions in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. Students completing degree programs in the College for Design and Social Inquiry are prepared to assume the role of responsible citizenship in our increasingly complex society.

The College for Design and Social Inquiry awards the degrees of Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), Bachelor of Arts with major in Criminal Justice (B.A.), Bachelor of Public Management (B.P.M.),
Bachelor of Public Safety Administration (B.P.S.A.), Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.), Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning (B.U.R.P.) and Bachelor of Urban Design (B.U.D.). It also awards a joint Bachelor of Architecture/Master of Urban and Regional Planning (B.Arch./M.U.R.P.) degree and several minors.

At the graduate level, the College offers degree programs leading to the Master of Science with a major in Criminology and Criminal Justice (M.S.), Master of Nonprofit Management (M.N.M.), Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.), Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) and Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.). A Doctor of Philosophy with a major in Public Administration (Ph.D.) is also offered.

Details on all of the above degree program offerings are listed in this section under the schools in which the programs are offered. The schools are listed in alphabetical order: School of Architecture, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, School of Public Administration, School of Social Work and School of Urban and Regional Planning.


Bachelor’s Degree Program Information

Admission Requirements and Recommendations
Applicants for admission to the College for Design and Social Inquiry must meet the general freshman or transfer admission requirements of the University. Consult the Admissions section of this catalog for specific requirements.


Students applying to the College for Design and Social Inquiry must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and have completed the necessary prerequisite coursework associated with the particular prospective degree program. For additional admission requirements for each school, consult the appropriate sections below.

Should there be any outstanding requirements at the time of application to the College, attempts should be made to complete these deficiencies early in the junior year. The School of Architecture requires that all prerequisites be met prior to the beginning of design classes at FAU.

Successful achievement of the educational objectives of degree programs is based upon the assumption that students have attained general education competencies. Excessive enrollments in lower-level (1000/2000) courses should be avoided, unless these credits are to fulfill prerequisites. In addition, transfer students should have fulfilled the University’s CLAS requirement, writing requirement (WAC) and math requirement (Gordon Rule); see the Degree Requirements section of this catalog for details. Students who have not fulfilled the CLAS requirements may be prohibited from registering. Students who are missing any section of the CLAS must see their academic advisor. Students who have not completed the CLAS requirements may not apply for graduation.
(CLAS is no longer required; effective fall 2011.)

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Degree Requirements
All candidates for a baccalaureate degree from the College for Design and Social Inquiry must satisfy all:

1. General baccalaureate degree requirements of the University with a minimum of 120 approved credits in academic courses, except Architecture, which requires a minimum of 159 approved credits.

2. Requirements for the degree as specified by the school in which the program is offered. These requirements are listed in the sections describing the various degree programs below. Students in Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning should consult their respective program’s student manual/handbook for more detailed information.

3. Requirements of the College for Design and Social Inquiry.

Requirements of the College for Design and Social Inquiry

1. Students must declare a major as early as possible.

2. Students must complete each course and the number of credits required in the major as prescribed by the particular degree program. Courses in the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. A grade of “C-” does not satisfy the requirement. Any coursework in the major's field transferred from another institution must be approved by the major's school.

3. Outstanding prerequisites should be satisfied early in the junior year, except in the School of Architecture. The School of Architecture requires that all prerequisites, including general education and preprofessional, be met prior to enrolling in the upper-division (3000 level or above) design studio sequence. Failure to fulfill all prerequisites prevents entry into any design studio. Students who have not met prerequisites will be administratively withdrawn from the course at the time the deficiency is determined to exist.

4. A minimum FAU grade point average of 2.0 in all coursework attempted, except in the Bachelor of Social Work, which requires a minimum FAU GPA of 2.5 to begin the practice class sequence and to be eligible for field education.

5. The College’s programs offer internships that meet degree requirements. Consult with the appropriate faculty internship coordinator for internship planning. Students should note that while cooperative education experiences are available in some disciplines, such credits do not count toward graduation requirements.

6. Students seeking waivers from any given requirement must still fulfill the credit requirement. For example, students waived from PAD 4941 (Government Internship) must take a 3-credit PAD course in its place. Waivers must be approved according to the procedures of the school. Students should consult with their faculty program coordinator.

7. The last 30 upper-division credits (3000/4000-level courses and 5000-level courses for Architecture majors) must be earned in residence at FAU.

8. A minimum of 45 credits toward the degree must be at the upper-division (3000 and 4000) level for the Criminology and Criminal Justice, Social Work and Urban and Regional Planning programs. For Public Management, students must complete a minimum of 54 upper-division credits. For Architecture, students must complete 99 upper-division credits, including courses at the 5000 level.

9. Students should be aware of curriculum changes pertinent to this academic year, but subsequent to the publishing of this catalog.

10. As students prepare for program completion and graduation from the University, they must consult with an academic advisor to review their degree audit during the semester prior to intended graduation.

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Curriculum Progression and Advisement
The College for Design and Social Inquiry seriously regards its responsibility and partnership with its students to ensure efficient and effective progression through the various curricula. Appropriate academic advising is one means by which such progression occurs. Upon entry into the College, students must consult with an academic coordinator for initial program review and planning. During the course of the student’s tenure in the College, each student must seek academic advisement in the respective major. Faculty and professional advisors are available to assist students in appropriate curriculum progression. Appropriate curriculum progression includes ensuring the fulfillment of state and program requirements.

Foreign Language Requirements
All students must satisfy the foreign language requirement for admission to the University. Only students in the baccalaureate Criminal Justice degree program need to satisfy the University’s foreign language graduation requirement (see the Degree Requirements section).

Graduation Requirements
Students in the College for Design and Social Inquiry may not cross enroll at another institution during their graduation semester.
Students should make advising appointments in a timely manner to ensure that they do not fall into either of the above categories.

Students may not graduate with incomplete ("I") grades. Please note the Incomplete Grades policy listed under The Grading System link in the Academic Policies and Regulations section of this catalog.

Policy on Use of Recording Devices in the Classroom
The College for Design and Social Inquiry prohibits audio and video recording of instructional activities in classrooms, laboratories and studios without the expressed written consent of the instructor. This does not apply to students receiving services from the Office of Students with Disabilities. When the instructor’s consent is given, the materials are not for distribution or sale in any fashion.

Student Responsibility
1. Students are responsible for reading this University Catalog and the Academic Calendar and registering, adding, dropping and/or withdrawing from courses. Students must meet all course prerequisites and corequisites.

2. Students who are enrolled at another institution are responsible for having their grades transferred to FAU at the end of each semester.

3. Students are required to meet with their advisor in person at least once a year.

4. An Application for Degree must be submitted to the academic advisor within the first two weeks of the intended semester of graduation. See the University’s Academic Calendar for important dates. Faculty and staff are not responsible for reminding students of deadlines.

Disruptive Student Behavior
The College for Design and Social Inquiry honors the individual and collective pursuits and outcomes that are facilitated by its faculty and engaged in by its students. A positive learning environment is essential for the provision of a quality education. The classroom must be respected as a place of individual dignity and educational growth and development. Consequently, any interference with or obstruction of the educational process is considered disruptive and will not be tolerated. Disruptive conduct is a violation of the Florida Atlantic University Student Code of Conduct and will be treated as such.

Student Services
The College for Design and Social Inquiry encourages student success and excellence and strives to make the University experience all that it can be. The College's advising center provides professional staff to assist students throughout their academic experience at FAU. Staff members are located at four campuses for easy access; appointments and walk-in days are available.

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Combined Degree Program Information

The School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Regional Planning offer a combined B.Arch./M.U.R.P. degree for architecture students wishing to engage their interest in planning and urban design through integrated graduate study. Eligible students can graduate with both a professional B.Arch. degree and a M.U.R.P. degree after six years of full-time study. See the program’s description under the School of Architecture heading in this section.

Master's Degree Program Information

Specific requirements for master’s degree programs in the College for Design and Social Inquiry are detailed within each school’s description in this College section.

Doctoral Degree Program Information

The School of Public Administration offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Public Administration. This doctoral program is designed to qualify students in research, university teaching and consultation. Admission and degree requirements for this Ph.D. program are listed within the School of Public Administration description in this College section.

Certificate Programs

Several certificate programs are offered in the College for Design and Social Inquiry. The School of Public Administration offers graduate certificates in Public Administration, Nonprofit Management and Public Procurement, and an undergraduate certificate in Public Procurement. The School of Social Work offers graduate as well as undergraduate certificates in Child Welfare and Aging. Graduate certificate programs in the School of Urban and Regional Planning include Economic Development and Tourism, Environmental Planning, Sustainable Community Planning and Visual Planning Technology.

Requirements for all certificate programs are listed within their specific schools in this College section. Students must apply for the certificate through their advisors upon completion of the coursework.

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School of Architecture

Faculty:
Hardy, D. J., Director; Abbate, A. J.; Caldierón, J.; d’Anjou, P.; Haupt, H.; Kulic, V.; Lyn, F. E.; Sandell, J.; Thitiswat, M.; Vermisso, E.

The School of Architecture prepares students for the professional practice of architecture. Situated in the broader context of the humanities and social sciences, the curriculum is composed of specialized courses in history, theory, technology and design communication built around a core of a progressive sequence of architectural design studios.

The School of Architecture offers the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), an accredited first professional degree. The School offers a preprofessional lower-division program and an upper-division professional degree program. Both are limited-access programs. The School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Regional Planning offer a combined degree program for students interested in pursuing graduate-level studies in planning in addition to their professional degree in architecture.

Program Accreditation
In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year or 2-year term of accreditation depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially,
constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The Florida Atlantic University, College for Design and Social Inquiry, School of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: B. Arch. (159 credits, undergraduate and graduate, as required). Next accreditation visit for this program: 2011.

Bachelor of Architecture Degree/Link to Combined Bachelor/Master's Program
(Minimum 159 approved course credits required)
Lower-division courses are offered at the Boca Raton campus
Upper-division courses are offered at the Fort Lauderdale campus


Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Application to Lower-Division Preprofessional Program
Prior to application to the School of Architecture, admission to the University is required. (Refer to the Admissions section of this catalog.)

Lower-Division Preprofessional Course Sequence

In addition to the General Education requirements, the following courses are required. A minimum grade of “C” is required for each architecture (ARC-prefixed) course. A grade of “C-” or below does not meet this requirement. When a grade below a “C” is earned, the course will not count toward any portion of the 159-credit requirement.

Year 1 (Freshman Level)
Architectural Design 1 ARC 1301
Culture and Architecture ARC 2208
Architectural Design 2 ARC 1302
Materials and Methods 1 ARC 2461
Year 2 (Sophomore Level)
Architectural Design 3 ARC 2303
Theory of Architecture ARC 2201
Architectural Design 4 ARC 2304
Architectural Structures ARC 2501
Calculus with Analytical Geometry 1 MAC 2311
College Physics 1 PHY 2053

Application to Upper-Division Professional Degree Program
The following students are eligible to apply to the professional degree program:

    1.Students who have successfully completed the lower-division preprofessional program at Florida Atlantic University;

    2. Students with an approved Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree in Architecture from Broward College, Hillsborough Community College, Indian River State College, Miami Dade College, Palm Beach State College, St. Petersburg College or Valencia Community College;

    3. Transfer students from an accredited degree program in architecture.

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Students applying to the professional degree program with an approved A.A. preprofessional degree in Architecture or transfer students from an accredited program in architecture must submit evidence of having completed the necessary prerequisite courses or course equivalents. Course equivalents for in-state colleges are determined by state guidelines. Course equivalence from other accredited programs is verified by faculty review of the corresponding published course descriptions and syllabi. Only grades of "C" or better are accepted for all required courses. Courses for which grades of "C-" or lower are indicated in official transcripts shall not be accepted for credit toward the 159-credit requirement.

Applicants with any portion of their education completed abroad must have their foreign credentials evaluated by an accredited independent evaluation service. This evaluation should reflect a course-by-course evaluation with a cumulative grade point average for each institution attended. The course descriptions must be translated into English by such evaluation agency or by the institution from which the student is transferring. The National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (www.NACES.org) has a list of agencies. In addition, applicants with international academic backgrounds must demonstrate English proficiency by earning a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). International applicants must also verify nation of citizenship with the appropriate documentation.  Applicants who wish to transfer from out-of-state or international institutions must submit course descriptions from their institutions’ catalog of each architecture, mathematics and physics course earned with a grade of “C” or better. 

The School of Architecture seeks to make sound decisions regarding its acceptance of non-Florida courses as equivalent substitutions at the 3000-4000 level. To this end, it is the policy of the School that each applicant reviews the FAU course curriculum noting the Student Performance Criteria (SPC) assigned to each current course. If a course substitution is desired for any course, the applicant must submit original physical proof (e.g. plans, cost allocation exercises, building sections, tests, research papers, etc.) indicating the applicant’s ability or understanding as required. Reference should be made to  www.naab.org  for official details of the SPC and level of performance. The course curriculum serves to assist the applicant in documenting that the ability and understanding associated with the various primary and supplemental performance criteria required by the National Architecture Accrediting Board have been acquired. If an applicant fails to adequately demonstrate such ability and understanding relative to the SPCs, the course is disqualified from equivalency consideration and its use as a substitute for the required School of Architecture course is denied. It may be used as an elective.

Applications to the School of Architecture are accepted only from students who have been accepted for admission to Florida Atlantic University. Applicants must demonstrate the potential to successfully complete the professional degree program. Admission and placement is determined by the faculty upon review of each application including the following. The decision by the faculty to recommend admission and placement is final and may not be appealed.

    1. Overall Grade Point Average (GPA);

    2. TOEFL score of 550 or greater for students whose primary language is not English;

    3. Official transcripts of academic records;

    4. Copies of published course descriptions and syllabi for the purpose of determining conformance of courses submitted as equivalent to the required courses in the curriculum;

    5. Assigned sample of writing;

    6. Portfolio of student work;

    7. Completed application to the School of Architecture.

Application Deadlines for Fall Enrollments
University applications are due prior to the end of business on the last Friday of January.

School of Architecture applications including portfolios are due prior to the end of business on the last Friday of February.

Assigned writing samples, required of all applicants, are conducted at 10 a.m. on the last Friday of February.

Portfolio and Writing Sample Submissions
Students applying for admission to the School of Architecture must submit a portfolio of work. Portfolios that are not submitted with the application shall not be accepted. Portfolios should emphasize the scope and quality of the applicant’s academic work, including representative examples from each level of design studio coursework completed for academic credit. Failure to include academic work in the portfolio will disqualify the applicant from admission.

All applicants to the School of Architecture are required to participate in a writing exercise.  The assigned writing sample is completed by each applicant in person on the scheduled date and time in Room 814 in the FAU-BC Higher Education Complex, 111 East Las Olas Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301.


Portfolio Format

    1. 8 ½" x 11" (letter size) only. No fold out, rolled or other formats are acceptable.

    2. The cover page shall include the applicant’s full name, Z number, address, telephone number(s), email address and date of birth.

    3. The cover page shall indicate which level of admission the applicant is pursuing (lower division, upper division, professional thesis level).

    4. Only high-quality reproductions of original work will be accepted for portfolio review. Do not submit originals.

    5. Portfolios shall not exceed 24 pages.

    6. Organize the presentation of projects sequentially, showing progress made from earliest design coursework with emphasis on the most recent work. Examples of design studio coursework are required; however, the applicant may also include other creative works.

    7. Each project presented in the portfolio shall be clearly labeled to indicate the following information: course number and title, project title with a brief description and semester completed. For all group assignments or other collaborative works, indicate the work directly attributed to the applicant.

Writing samples
Writing samples are evaluated to determine the applicant’s capability for upper-division writing and analysis. All applicants are required to complete short handwritten essays on subject matters to be announced at the time of the writing exercise. Applicants are provided ample time to complete the task. The faculty will assess writing samples with equal weight on legibility, grammar, spelling, critical thinking and concise expression.

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Upper-Division Professional Degree Course Sequence
All students admitted to the B.Arch. program are expected to enter the professional course sequence with the ability to prepare graphic presentations utilizing normative descriptive architectural drawing techniques. All students admitted to the program are required to complete ARC 3319, Architectural Design Techniques, prior to enrolling in the design studio sequence. This introductory course is usually offered during the summer and fall semesters. Students demonstrating exceptional graphic ability may be exempt from this requirement by the faculty of the School.

A minimum grade of “C” is required for each architecture (ARC-prefixed) course, including electives. A grade of “C-” or below does not meet this requirement. When a grade below a “C” is earned, the course will not count toward any portion of the 159-credit requirement.

Year 3 (Junior Level)

Architectural Design Techniques ARC 3319
3
Architectural Design 5 ARC 3320
4
Materials and Methods of Construction ARC 3463
3
Pre-Modern Architecture History and Theory ARC 3710
3
Site Planning and Engineering ARC 3374
3
Architectural Design 6 or ARC 3321
4 or
Vertical Studio ARC 4322
4
Architectural Structures 2 ARC 3503
3
Environmental Technology 1 ARC 3610
3
Electives (3000, 4000 level)  
10
Year 4 (Senior Level)
Architectural Theory ARC 4219
3
Architectural Design 7 or ARC 4326
4 or
Vertical Studio ARC 4322
4
Professional Practice 1 ARC 4270
3
Modern Arch. History and Theory ARC 4712
3
Architectural Design 8 or ARC 4327
4 or
Vertical Studio ARC 4322
4
Environmental Technology 2 ARC 4620
3
Architectural Structures 3 ARC 4504
3

Note: Students may enroll once in ARC 4322, Vertical Studio, as a substitute for one of the following: ARC 3321, ARC 4326 or ARC 4327. Prerequisites and corequisites for each apply. (See Course Description section for ARC 3321, ARC 4326 and ARC 4327 for further information.)

Year 5 (Thesis Level)
Project Research Methods ARC 5910
3
Advanced Architectural Design 1 ARC 5328
6
Note: ARC 5910 and ARC 5328 are taken concurrently.
Professional Practice 1 2
(eff. summer 2012)
ARC 5271
3
Comprehensive Design Project ARC 5352
6
Professional Practice 2 3***
(eff. summer 2012)
ARC 5272
3
Electives (3000, 4000, 5000 level)  
12

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Combined Program

Bachelor of Architecture/Master of Urban and Regional Planning
This program is available only to students who are beginning the thesis level of study in the B.Arch. program. The B.Arch/M.U.R.P. joint degree program consists of a total of 63 credits, including 33 credits at the 4000-5000 level in Architecture (ARC-prefixed courses) and 30 credits at the 6000 level in Urban and Regional Planning (URP-prefixed courses).

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Application to the B.Arch./M.U.R.P. Combined Degree Program
The following students are eligible to apply to this program:

    1. Matriculated students in good standing at FAU in the junior or senior levels of study in the B.Arch. who will be registering for the thesis level.

    2. Second baccalaureate students transferring to FAU to complete the thesis/capstone level.

To be eligible, B.Arch. students must have no academic deficiencies at the end of their senior level or upon admission to the thesis level if transferring from another institution.

FAU students may apply with a letter of recommendation from the faculty of the School of Architecture and separate admission to the M.U.R.P. program in the School of Urban and Regional Planning. Applicants must complete the GRE exam and submit a personal statement of intent. (See the admission requirements for the M.U.R.P. program in the School of Urban and Regional Planning.)

Application Deadlines for Fall 2011 Enrollments

For current B.Arch. students, the complete application must be submitted prior to the end of business on April 1, 2011, for the fall 2011 term.

The graduate application, including letter of recommendation, personal statement of intent and GRE scores, must be submitted to the Graduate College.

For second baccalaureate students, the undergraduate application and supporting documentation must be received by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions prior to the end of business on February 4, 2011, for the fall 2011 term. Refer to all requirements and submittal deadlines for the School of Architecture. 

GRE scores and a letter of recommendation must be submitted to the Graduate College no later than April 1, 2011 for the fall 2011 term. The letter of recommendation shall be contingent upon a full transcript review, portfolio evaluation and subsequent design studio placement by the faculty of the School of Architecture. If placement is below ARC 5328 (Advanced Architectural Design 1), the student is not eligible for enrollment in the combined degree program.

Academic Progression and Standing
Students may continue their matriculation in this joint program based on satisfactory academic performance as defined by the standard of the M.U.R.P. program. Students are required to maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) throughout the program. Computation of cumulative GPA begins with the first semester of enrollment in the joint program. Failure to maintain the required minimum GPA results in placement on academic probation. Continued failure to achieve the required minimum GPA after two successive semesters shall result in dismissal from the M.U.R.P. program and, subsequently, from the joint program. All grades earned remain part of the student’s academic record. Students who are dismissed from the program may not reapply or return to the program.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Combined Program
Matriculated B.Arch. students may elect to withdraw from the joint degree program. Such withdrawal would be specifically from the graduate (M.U.R.P.) component. The student must confer with the joint program coordinator and graduate academic advisor and submit letters of notification to the School of Architecture, the School of Urban and Regional Planning and the Graduate College.

Students who elect to withdraw from the combined program may not reapply or return to the program. Students who have voluntarily withdrawn from the combined degree program who subsequently seek the M.U.R.P. degree must complete their B.Arch. degree, provided they are in good academic standing, and then may apply to the School of Urban and Regional Planning for the full 48-credit M.U.R.P. degree. Students who are not matriculated in the combined degree program may apply their credits toward only one degree.

School of Architecture Student Handbook
Policies and protocols regarding registration, ethical conduct, discipline and other matters are found in the current edition of the School of Architecture Student Handbook. The School of Architecture may publish amendments and modifications as needed on an ongoing basis.

Intellectual Property
Student work submitted to the School of Architecture to satisfy course or degree requirements is the property of the School. Students, as authors of the original work, retain all rights to the intellectual property of such work, including papers, drawings, models and other materials. At the discretion of the faculty, all student submissions may be retained, returned or discarded.

Enhanced Learning Opportunities
The School of Architecture may organize field trips and travel study programs (domestic and international) to provide an opportunity to enrich the educational experience. While students are encouraged to participate in these activities, additional fees may apply. Students interested in international study opportunities should register with the Office of International Programs.

Scholarships and Grants
The School of Architecture offers a number of stipends, grants and other financial assistance on an annual basis. Students are encouraged to apply. (See the School of Architecture Student Handbook for more information.)

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School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Faculty:
Thai, K., Interim Director; Arnekelev, B. J.; Bazemore, G.; Boba, R.; Dobrin, A.; Griswold, D. B.; Hinduja, S.; Kalinich, D.; Lilley, D.; Mangan, R.; Massey, C. R.; Reckdenwald, A.; Schiff, M.F.; Stinchcomb, J. B.

Bachelor of Arts Degree/Link to Master's Program
(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) with a major in Criminal Justice provides students with knowledge about the nature and causes of crime and delinquency, law and the legal system for juveniles and adults in American society, and the decision processes of criminal justice agencies. A Criminal Justice major is broadly educated within a general education framework in the liberal arts and also provided with courses that directly apply to careers within the criminal and juvenile justice systems and the study of law. The baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice provides the student with a suitable foundation for graduate study in criminal justice, criminology, public administration and other graduate school programs.

Admission Requirements
For admission to this program, the student must meet the general admission requirements of the University as described in the Admissions section of this catalog.

In some instances, students may be admitted without having completed general education requirements. In such cases, those courses must be completed early in the junior year. The student may be required to complete additional courses to satisfy degree requirements.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
The Criminal Justice curriculum requires a minimum of 120 credits. To earn the degree, students must complete all of the University degree requirements in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

The program for Criminal Justice consists of 30 credits of 3000/4000-level coursework. Students who begin FAU as freshmen are required to take CCJ 2002 as a prerequisite to 3000/4000-level criminal justice courses. In this case, CCJ 2002 will apply toward the 30-credit requirement. CCJ 2002 is closed to both Criminal Justice majors who have taken any 3000- or 4000-level CCJ course(s) and to transfer students. The remaining 30 credits may be taken from electives throughout the various colleges in the University. No more than 42 credits in the major may be counted toward the degree. To be certified as completing the requirements for the Criminal Justice major, students must successfully complete the statistics prerequisite (STA 2023 or STA 3163) and all Criminal Justice core courses with a grade of "C" or better. Additionally, the last 30 upper-division credits (3000/4000-level courses) must be earned in residence at FAU.

To earn a bachelor of arts degree from a state university in Florida, students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the college level. Earning college credit at the Language 2 level (courses such as FRE 1121 or SPN 1121) satisfies this mandate. Students meeting the FAU foreign language admission requirement with two years of high school language have not satisfied the graduation requirement. Students must demonstrate additional proficiency either by earning Language 2-level college credit or by satisfying the requirement through other means, such as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam.

A minimum grade of “C” is required for every CCJ-, CJC-, CJE-, CJL- or DSC-prefixed course. If a grade below a “C” (such as “C-”) is earned in a CCJ-, CJC-, CJE-, CJL- or DSC-prefixed course, the course will not count toward any portion of the 120-credit program.

Required Prerequisite
Introductory Statistics STA 2023 or
Intermediate Statistics STA 3163
3
Required Criminal Justice Core - 9 credits
Criminology CCJ 3014
3
The Criminal Justice System CCJ 3024
3
Methods of Research
in Criminal Justice
CCJ 4700
3
Required Criminology and Criminal Justice Electives -
21 credits from the following list
Law, Crime and the Criminal
Justice System (closed to
upper-division CJ majors)
CCJ 2002
3
Community Service Systems CCJ 3126
3
Crime in the Schools CCJ 3660
3
Victimology CCJ 3666
3
Co-op Criminal Justice CCJ 3949+
1-3
Criminal Justice Management CCJ 4450
3
Policing in America
CJE 4352
3
Ethics and the Justice System CCJ 4054
3
Juvenile Justice CJJ 4010
3
Studying Violence CCJ 4623
3
Organized Crime and the
Business of Drugs
CCJ 4642
3
White Collar Crime CCJ 4644
3
Women and Criminal Justice CCJ 4670
3
Directed Independent Study CCJ 4905
1-3
Issues in Criminal Law CCJ 4931
3
Special Topics CCJ 4934
3
Criminal Justice Field Experience CCJ 4940++
3
Criminal Justice Study Abroad CCJ 4947
3
Corrections CJC 4310
3
International Criminal Justice System CJE 4174
3
Crime Prevention CJE 4444
3
Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation CJE 4610
3
Criminal Law and Constitution CJL 4064
3
Judicial Administration and the
Criminal Courts
CJL 4510
3
Terrorism DSC 4012
3
Out-of-Major Electives - 30 credits

+ Does not count toward graduation.
++ Grading: S/U

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Minor in Criminal Justice

A minor in Criminal Justice shall consist of a minimum of 15 credits in upper-division criminal justice courses. The student must complete:
1. Criminology, CCJ 3014, and The Criminal Justice System, CCJ 3024 (6 credits); and
2. Any three of the criminal justice electives at the 3000 or above course level (9 credits).

A minimum grade of “C” is required for each CCJ-, CJC-, CJE-, CJL- or DSC-prefixed course. In the case of transfer students, a minimum of 12 credits of upper-division courses with the CCJ, CJC, CJE, CJL or DSC prefix must be taken in residence at Florida Atlantic University, including core courses, if lacking.

Master’s Program

Master of Science with Major in Criminology and Criminal Justice

This graduate master’s degree program is designed for students who are:

1. Seeking intermediate-level administrative or research positions;
2. Employed in the criminal justice system and wish to broaden their perspectives and advance within the system;
3. Pursuing a teaching career at a community or state college;
4. Planning to continue in a doctoral program;
5. Preparing to enter law school.

The purpose of the program is to provide graduate-level learning opportunities to students interested in advancing their knowledge in the areas of criminological theory and administrative theory as applied to the criminal justice system. Students may advance their skills and knowledge in research in applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice. This program allows students to develop a personal curriculum consistent with their academic and career goals. Students concentrate on the theoretical or administrative aspects of the criminal justice system or create a more research-oriented program geared toward future doctoral study.

Admission Requirements
Admission to the Master of Science (M.S.) with major in Criminology and Criminal Justice program requires a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a valid, official GRE score (less than five years old). Admission is based on a formula that considers the applicant’s GRE score and undergraduate GPA (calculated from the last 60 credits of the degree). The combination of the GPA and the GRE score must equal 1600 or higher to assure admission into the program. The formula is as follows:
Undergraduate GPA x 200 + GRE score = total score.

Highly promising applicants who do not meet the required minimum score can petition the graduate coordinating committee for a review of their file, including such evidence as undergraduate grade trends, professional work experience, performance in preparatory undergraduate criminal justice courses, subsequent scores after retaking the GRE and previously taken graduate-level courses. Petitioning applicants should submit a letter of intent describing their academic and/or career goals and provide evidence of their graduate-level competence.

Transfer Credit
Acceptance of transfer credits from accredited institutions is dependent on relevance of the coursework to the Master of Science with major in Criminology and Criminal Justice Program. Transfer of credits should occur at the time of admission and is limited to 6 credits with a minimum grade of “B” in each course (3.0 in a 4.0 grading system). Credits older than seven years may not be transferred to the graduate program. No graduate credit is granted for correspondence, life experience or extension work.

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Admission Requirements for International Students
Graduates of colleges or universities outside of the United States who have completed an academic program equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree may apply for admission. International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to submit a score of 550 or higher (CBT-213 or higher) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before enrolling in coursework. Applicants must write to Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. 08540, or visit www.ets.org/toefl for assistance.

All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

Time Limitations
Candidates for the Master of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice must complete all degree requirements within a seven-consecutive-year period after initial registration in the program.

Academic Standing
Continuation in the program requires satisfactory progress toward degree completion. Evidence of such progress includes maintenance of an overall 3.0 cumulative GPA. For each course, no grade lower than “C” is acceptable to fulfill program requirements. That is, a “C-” would not be acceptable.

Students who do not maintain the required 3.0 cumulative GPA are placed on academic probation during the semester immediately following the one in which their cumulative GPA dropped below 3.0. Failure to regain a 3.0 cumulative GPA within two successive semesters thereafter will result in dismissal from the program. Students may also be dismissed at any time that they are not making satisfactory progress toward completion of the degree.

Prerequisites
Students lacking an upper-division undergraduate criminal justice course are strongly advised to take CCJ 3014, Criminology; CCJ 3024, Criminal Justice Systems; or a substitute approved by a faculty advisor. Students are required to take an undergraduate statistics course such as STA 2023. Prerequisite coursework is not applied toward degree requirements.

Thesis Option
The thesis option is designed for students seeking either a research career in criminal justice or those intending to pursue a Ph.D. program and ultimately an academic career at the university level. Students selecting the thesis option will learn to conduct methodologically sound and theoretically grounded research. The thesis process can help prepare students for doctoral-level research and coursework. Students are required to take 6 thesis credits and either quantitative or qualitative research methods.

Students considering the thesis option should recruit a faculty member early in the program to be their advisor and chair of their thesis committee. The program coordinator can advise on specific departmental policies and procedures regarding thesis requirements.

Comprehensive Examination Option
This option is designed for practicing criminal justice professionals who are seeking advanced skills and intellectual development in preparation for administrative and leadership positions within the system. In the Comprehensive Exam Option, students will learn to assess the practical application of theory and research to policy and program development. As they complete their graduate studies, students will be required to demonstrate their level of knowledge and understanding through a comprehensive examination.

Students electing this option must apply for the examination through the program coordinator during the first month of their last term prior to graduation. The program coordinator can advise on specific departmental policies and procedures regarding the comprehensive examinations.

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Degree Requirements
The Master of Science with a major in Criminology and Criminal Justice Program consists of 33 credits. The program mandates a four-course core (12 credits). The remaining courses (21 credits) are selected by students with the advice and consent of their program coordinator. Students choosing the thesis option must select either quantitative or qualitative research methods prior to beginning their thesis research.

Core Requirements - 12 credits
Foundations of Criminology CCJ 6056
3
Research Methods CCJ 6704
3
Foundations in Criminal Justice CCJ 6902
3
Graduate Statistics (select one):  
3
Applied Methods 1 PAD 6701 or
Educational Statistics STA 6113
Electives - 21 credits
Select seven courses for 21 credits. Thesis option requires CCJ 6709.
Restorative Community Justice CCJ 6142
3
Conflict Management
and Dispute Resolution
CCJ 6196
3
Leadership and Future Issues in Criminal Justice Agencies CCJ 6456
3
Management Implications of Justice Policy and Management CCJ 6458
3
Organizational Culture in Criminal Justice Agencies CCJ 6475
3
Criminal Justice Policy Analysis CCJ 6485
3
Issues in Community Justice CCJ 6489
3
Victims and the Justice Process CCJ 6675
3
Women and Crime CCJ 6676
3
Qualitative Research and
Evaluation in Justice Systems
(Prerequisite: PAD 6701)
CCJ 6709
3
Directed Independent Study CCJ 6905
3
Seminar in Justice Policy Reform CCJ 6931*
3
Special Topics CCJ 6934
3
Master’s Thesis CCJ 6971
1-6
Corrections CJC 6021
3
Police and the Community CJE 6426
3
Juvenile Justice CJJ 6046
3

* Note: course should be taken at end of program.

Specialization in Restorative Community Justice

This specialization consists of 33 total credits, distributed as follows:

Core Requirements - 12 credits
Requirements for Specialization - 12 credits
Restorative Community Justice CCJ 6142
3
Conflict Management
and Dispute Resolution
CCJ 6196
3
Issues in Community Justice CCJ 6489
3
Victims and the Justice Process CCJ 6675
3
Electives - 9 credits (choose from program list)

Specialization in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Interested degree-seeking students who are majoring in other disciplines can complete a 15-credit specialization in Criminology and Criminal Justice:

Core Requirements - 12 credits
Elective: any gradaute-level CCJ elective

Restorative Community Justice Certificate
Students who are not planning to complete the entire Master of Science with major in Criminology and Criminal Justice Program have the option of obtaining a 12-credit certificate in Restorative Community Justice, which consists of the following courses:

Restorative Community Justice CCJ 6142
3
Conflict Management
and Dispute Resolution
CCJ 6196
3
Issues in Community Justice CCJ 6489
3
Victims and the Justice Process CCJ 6675
3

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School of Public Administration

Faculty:
Thai, K., Director; Ben-Zadok, E.; Carter, R. Y.; Cooper, D.; Cory-Scruggs, F.; Farazmand, A.; Leip, L.; McCue, C.; Miller, H.; Nyhan, R.; Patterson, P.; Sapat, A.; Sementelli, A.; Vanyolos, I.

The School of Public Administration offers a Bachelor of Public Management degree program, a Bachelor of Public Safety Administration, minors in Nonprofit Management and Public Management and a Certificate in Public Procurement.

For graduate students, the School offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Public Administration, a Master of Nonprofit Management, a Master of Public Administration and executive certificates in Nonprofit Management, Public Administration and Public Procurement.

Bachelor of Public Management/Link to Master's Programs/Link to Doctoral Program
(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Bachelor of Public Management (B.P.M.) degree is designed to provide a broad understanding of the administrative structures and functions found in public sector organizations. In addition to equipping students with foundation skills relevant to work in pjljublic sector organizations, the B.P.M. encourages study in related areas such as architecture, business, criminal justice, political science, psychology, social work, sociology and urban and regional planning. In this way, students have an opportunity to adapt their programs of study to fit their own academic and career interests.

Admission Requirements
For admission to this program, students must meet the general admission requirements of the University as described in the Admissions section of this catalog. In addition, the following courses or their equivalents must have been completed at the lower-division level:

Government of the U.S. POS 1041
3
Macroeconomic Principles ECO 2013
3
Information Systems Fundamentals ISM 2000
3
Introductory Statistics STA 2023
3

Students admitted without having completed the above prerequisites must complete them early in their junior years with a "C-" or better.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
To earn the B.P.M. degree, students must complete all of the requirements of the University described in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

Transfer Credit
Transfer of 3000-4000-level PAD coursework is not allowed unless by exception. Exceptions are to be made via the petition process at the time of admission, and requested transfer credits are limited to 9 credits in which the student earned a minimum grade of “C.” Under no circumstances will students be able transfer courses to replace Public Management and Administration (PAD 3003) or Capstone Seminar in Public Management (PAD 4933). Credits older than seven years may not be transferred to the graduate program.

A minimum grade of “C” is required for core courses and the 9 credits of public administration electives as outlined below:

Required Core Courses - 24 credits
Public Management and Administration PAD 3003
3
Organizational Behavior and
Administrative Communication
PAD 3104
3
Public Budgeting and Finance PAD 4223*
3
Public Personnel and Supervisory Practices
Managing People in the Public Sector
(Change is effective summer 2012.)
PAD 4414*
3
Administrative Process and Ethics PAD 4604*
3
Quantitative Inquiry for Public Managers PAD 4702**
3
Research Methods for Public Mgmt. PAD 4704
3
Capstone Seminar in Public Management PAD 4933***
3

* Requires PAD 3003 as prerequisite.
** Requires STA 2023 or STA 3163 as prerequisites.
*** Requires senior standing and the completion of PAD 3003 with a "C" or better.

Public Administration Electives - 9 credits
(Select three courses from those listed below.)
Communication Skills for Public Managers PAD 3438
3
Computers Information Technology in Public Administration (chg. is eff. summer 2012.) PAD 3712
3
Introduction to Nonprofit Sector PAD 4144
3
Funding for Nonprofit Organizations PAD 4202
3
Financial Management
of Nonprofit Organizations
PAD 4203
3
Public Budgeting Techniques
and Processes
PAD 4228*
3
Program Evaluation in Public Management PAD 4320
3
Managing for Excellence in the Public
and Nonprofit Sectors
PAD 4332
3
Public Sector Labor Relations PAD 4426
3
State and Local Government Administration PAD 4806
3
Directed Independent Study PAD 4905**
3
Special Topics PAD 4931
3
Government Internship PAD 4941+
3
Nonprofit Internship PAD 4942
3

* Requires PAD 4223 as prerequisite.

** With approval of instructor and director of the School.

+ Government Internship requirement: Students with no significant experience in public sector organizations will be required to use 3 of the 9 PAD elective credits to complete the Government Internship course. Students with significant public sector experience must formally request a waiver of PAD 4941 from the faculty internship coordinator. A student who is granted the waiver is required to take a 3-credit PAD elective in lieu of the exempted PAD 4941 course.

Approved Electives, Upper-Division (21 credits):
Electives are selected and approved in consultation with the student’s academic advisor in the College for Design and Social Inquiry. Credits from this area may be used to satisfy deficiencies in general education requirements within limits imposed by College or University policies.

Free Electives (6 credits)

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Bachelor of Public Safety Administration (effective fall 2011)

The Bachelor of Public Safety Administration (B.P.S.A.) is an undergraduate degree program for South Florida professionals and pre-professionals interested in police, fire and disaster response practice and administration. Its overall purpose is to provide: (1) a professional/ pre-professional degree program for students entering the fields of law enforcement, fire safety, homeland security and disaster response; (2) interested students a foundation for continuing in a professionally focused graduate program and (3) an “umbrella degree” that allows students to combine key areas from several disciplines to graduate with a pre-professional degree. Students graduating from the program will have improved opportunities in the police, fire, homeland security (airports, seaports, etc.) and disaster management fields throughout South Florida and the United States. 

Admission Requirements
For admission to this program, students must meet the general admission requirements of the University as described in the Admissions section of the catalog.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution.

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Public Safety Administration requires 60 credits, including 18 credits in core requirements, 12 credits in one of three specializations, and 30 credits in electives as follows:

Required Core Courses - 18 credits
(The six courses below must be completed with a "C" or better.)
Public Management and Administration PAD 3003
3
Organizational Behavior and Administrative Communication PAD 3104
3
The Criminal Justice System or
Human Behavior and Social Environment 1
CCJ 3024 or
SOW 4101
3

Ethics and the Justice System or Administrative Process and Ethics

CCJ 4054 or PAD 4604
3
Managing for Excellence in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors PAD 4332
3
Minority Issues and Social Work SOW 4620
3


Specializations - 12 credits
(Students select one of the three specializations below.)
Law Enforcement/Corrections Specialization
(Select four courses from the list below. The courses must be completed with a "C" or better.)
Corrections CJC 4310
3
Crime in the School CCJ 3660
3
Organized Crime and the Business of Drugs CCJ 4642
3
White Collar Crime CCJ 4644
3
Policing in America CJE 4352
3
Crime Analysis CJE 4663
3
Criminal Justice Management CCJ 4450
3
Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation CJE 4610
3
Juvenile Justice Administration CJJ 4010
3
Criminal Justice Field Experience CCJ 4940
3
Terrorism DSC 4012
3
Crime Prevention CJE 4444
3
Studying Violence CCJ 4623
3
Disaster Management Specialization
(Select four courses from the list below. The courses must be completed with a "C" or better.)
Sustainable Cities URP 4403
3
Designing Safer Communities with CPTED ARC 4384
3
Multiagency Incident Command FES 3803
3
Introduction to Visual Planning Technology URP 4254
3
Government Internship PAD 4941
3
Fire Safety Specialization
(Select four courses from the list below. The courses must be completed with a "C" or better.)
Advanced Fire Administration (Required) FES 3015
3
Fire and Emergency Services Public Policy FES 3003
3
Personnel and Labor Relations in Fire Administration FES 3045
3
Analytical Approaches in Fire Administration FES 3780
3
Multiagency Incident Command FES 3803
3
Government Internship PAD 4941
3

Free Electives - 30 credits
The remaining 30 required credits (or 10 courses) are free electives available for students to customize their educational experience. Students are strongly encouraged to select electives that will enhance their general education coursework and that will support their intended baccalaureate degree program. Of the 30 elective credits, at least 15 credits must be upper-division courses (3000 or higher). The choice of free electives is a personal decision. However, the College for Design and Social Inquiry encourages consultation with the student’s academic advisor to ensure the process runs smoothly. Credits from this area may be used to satisfy deficiencies in general education requirements within limits imposed by College or University policies.

For more information about the B.P.S.A. program, including program admission, scheduling and other general questions, contact Professor Richard J. Mangan, Program Coordinator, at 561-297-2878 or rmangan@fau.edu.

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Minor in Nonprofit Management
A minor in Nonprofit Management consists of 15 credits of upper-division coursework. Of the 15 credits, at least 12 must be earned from FAU (effective spring 2011). The minor is designed for nonprofit professionals and others who wish to take these undergraduate courses to enhance their skills. A minimum grade of “C” is required for each course. Grades of “C-” and below are not acceptable.

Minor Requirements
Introduction to Nonprofit Sector PAD 4144
3
Funding for Nonprofit Organizations PAD 4202
3
Financial Management of
Nonprofit Organizations
PAD 4203
3
Managing for Excellence in the Public
and Nonprofit Sectors
PAD 4332 or
3
Special Topics (Legislative Advocacy) SOW 4930
Nonprofit Internship PAD 4942
3

The internship (PAD 4942) is waived for students with demonstrated experience in the nonprofit sector or for students enrolled in SOW 4510.

Minor in Public Management

A minor in Public Management consists of 15 credits of upper-division coursework. Of the 15 credits, at least 12 must be earned from FAU (effective spring 2011). The minor provides the student with a base of knowledge about management issues in government, the application of management principles, administrative and regulatory procedures, due process and administrative ethics. Additionally, the minor exposes the student to specific areas of public management, including public personnel, budgeting and finance and organizational behavior. A minimum grade of “C” is required for each PAD-prefixed course. Grades of “C-” and below cannot be applied to the minor.

Minor Requirements
Complete the following 12 credits:
Public Management and
Administration
PAD 3003
3
Organizational Behavior and Administrative Communication PAD 3104
3
Public Budgeting and Finance PAD 4223*
3
Public Personnel and Supervisory Practices
Managing People in the Public Sector
(Change is effective summer 2012.)
PAD 4414*
3
Complete 3 credits from the following:
Public Budgeting Techniques
and Processes
PAD 4228**
3
Program Evaluation in
Public Management
PAD 4320
3
Managing for Excellence in the Public
and Nonprofit Sectors
PAD 4332
3
Public Sector Labor Relations PAD 4426
3
Administrative Process and Ethics PAD 4604*
3
State and Local Government
Administration
PAD 4806
3
Special Topics PAD 4931
3

* Requires PAD 3003 as prerequisite.
** Requires PAD 4223 as prerequisite

Certificate in Public Procurement

Undergraduate students who are currently working in purchasing, students interested in this substantive field or others interested in learning about this critical function of government are encouraged to consider the Certificate in Public Procurement. Completion of this program will provide students with the practical knowledge and advanced skills necessary for seeking careers in public procurement and provide job advancement opportunities for those currently employed in the field. Certificate completion will also satisfy the educational requirements to sit for the Certified Professional Public Buyer (CPPB) or the Certified Public Purchasing Officer (CPPO) designation offered through the Universal Public Purchasing Certification Council.

Program Requirements
Upon successful completion of the five online courses identified below, the student will be awarded the Certificate in Public Procurement. Consistent with the School of Public Administration’s policy, students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in each of the five courses to successfully earn the certification.

Required Courses - 15 credits
Introduction to Public Sector Procurement PAD 4852
3
Administrative Process and Ethics of Public Sector Procurement PAD 4880
3
Public Sector Project Management Techniques PAD 4881
3
Public Sector Contract Planning and Analysis PAD 4853
3
Public Sector Contract Management PAD 4854
3

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Master’s Programs

The School of Public Administration offers two master’s degree programs: Master of Nonprofit Management (M.N.M.) and Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.). and several executive certificates outlined below.

Master of Nonprofit Management

Degree Goals
The Master of Nonprofit Management (M.N.M.) degree program was designed as a professional degree to meet the unique needs of the nonprofit sector. It is open to preservice students as well as managers and leaders in human services, fine and performing arts, and cultural, educational, community development, religious, environmental and other nonprofit organizations. The curriculum recognizes the special concerns of nonprofit organizations in such areas as: management of volunteers and professionals; resource development and fundraising; governance by volunteer boards of trustees and directors; management of multiple sources and types of funding; unique legal and regulatory issues; special values of service, community and charity; and the unique demands of nonprofit leadership.

Admission Requirements
Applicants to the M.N.M. program must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and a minimum average grade of “B” (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) in the last 60 credits of their undergraduate program. Applicants who fail to meet the above requirements may be considered for admission by exception. Applicants may submit a petition including Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and/or a 500-word writing sample stating why obtaining the M.N.M. is important to their career objectives. These admissions are made on a case-by-case basis after careful consideration of the petition, which may include special life and/or career circumstances described in an applicant’s petition. Such petitions require the approval of the Master of Nonprofit Management Committee.

Duplication and Recency of Credits
No credit counted as part of another degree may be counted toward the M.N.M. All work toward the M.N.M. must be completed within seven years after initial registration in the program.

Transfer Credit
Acceptance of transfer credits from approved institutions depends on the relevance of the work to the M.N.M. program. Request for transfer credits should be made at the time of admission and is limited to 6 credits in which the student earned a minimum grade of “B.” Students may use the petition process to transfer more than 6 credits. Credits older than seven years may not be transferred to the graduate program.

Non-Degree Credit
A maximum of 12 credits earned in non-degree status will be accepted toward the M.N.M. degree requirements, provided the grades earned are “B” or better

Admission Requirements for International Students
A graduate of a college or university outside of the United States who has completed an academic program equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to the M.N.M. program. All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

An international applicant for whom English is a second language is required to submit a score of 550 (CBT-213) or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before enrolling for courses. Applicants must write to Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08540, or visit www.ets.org/toefl for assistance.

Academic Standing
Continuation in the M.N.M. program requires satisfactory progress toward degree completion. Evidence of such progress includes maintenance of a “B” average each semester. No grade below “C” will be counted toward the degree.
Students who fall below the “B” average will be placed on academic probation. Failure to regain an overall cumulative “B” average within two successive semesters following the one in which the deficiency first occurred will result in dismissal.

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Degree Requirements
The faculty of the College will recommend awarding the Master of Nonprofit Management degree when the following requirements have been met:

1. Completion of 33 credits of approved coursework with no grade below “C,” with a minimum average grade of “B” (3.0 on a 4.0 scale). This work must include the 21-credit core and 12 additional credits of approved study.

2. Completion of the core courses:

Introduction to Nonprofit Management PAD 6142
3
Public Policy and Nonprofit
Organizations
PAD 6143
3
Fundraising for Nonprofits PAD 6206
3
Grantwriting and Project Management PAD 6233
3
Financial Management for
Nonprofit Managers
PAD 6260
3
Administrative Ethics PAD 6436
3
Seminar in Public, Private and Nonprofit Enterprise PAD 6506
3
Total  
21

3. Completion of three elective courses (9 credits) and an internship of 3 credits for all preservice students and those with little or no experience in the nonprofit sector. Students for whom the internship is waived must complete an additional 3-credit elective.

Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Management

This certificate is designed for professionals in the nonprofit sector who wish to take graduate-level courses to enhance their skills. Students will receive the certificate after completing four of the following six courses:

Introduction to Nonprofit Management PAD 6142
3
Public Policy and Nonprofit
Organizations
PAD 6143
3
Governance in Nonprofit Organizations PAD 6149
3
Fundraising for Nonprofits PAD 6206
3
Grantwriting and Project Management PAD 6233
3
Financial Management
for Nonprofit Managers
PAD 6260
3

The courses are normally completed within a three-semester time frame. Students must maintain registration during the fall or spring term for each of the academic years that the student is in the program. Any student not registered during one full academic year will be considered inactive. Participants must successfully complete the program with a grade point average of 3.0. Upon successful completion of the program, the student is awarded a certificate of completion.

A student can continue in the Master of Nonprofit Management program at FAU by applying for admission according to University procedures as outlined in this University Catalog. If admitted to the M.N.M. program, all certificate courses can be transferred, provided a grade of “B” or above is earned in each course.

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Master of Public Administration

FAU’s M.P.A. program has been fully accredited by NASPAA, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, for more than 20 years. The program just earned re-accreditation until 2013.

M.P.A. Mission
The mission of the Master of Public Administration is to provide intellectual, technical, analytical and practical education to enhance public service and to advance the state of knowledge in public administration within this geographic region and profession. There are four goals associated with the M.P.A. mission:

1. To provide students with an intellectual, technical, analytical and practical education in public administration.
2. To expose M.P.A. students to a faculty that advances the state of knowledge in the field of public administration through scholarly productivity, including publications, conference presentations and applied research.
3. To provide our geographic region and profession with public administration expertise by engaging in professional activities.
4. To encourage ethical deliberation, decision-making and behavior.

Admission Requirements
Applicants to the M.P.A. program must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. They should have a minimum average grade of “B” (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) in the last 60 credits of their undergraduate programs. All applicants must send a resumé to the College advising office.

Meeting minimal standards does not guarantee admission. Students who do not meet the minimal criterion of 3.0 or better in their undergraduate degrees are invited to supplement their applications with additional information that will be taken into account by the M.P.A. committee. These items should include some combination of: GRE scores; a 500-word personal statement detailing why earning the M.P.A. is important; samples of academic writing; letters of recommendation, preferably from full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty; GMAT scores if available;  evidence of  an earned master’s or law degree; and descriptions of challenging life, cultural and/or career circumstances that have been overcome. (Changes effective immediately.)

Duplication and Recency of Credits
No credit counted as part of another degree may be counted toward the M.P.A. All work toward the M.P.A. must be completed within seven years after initial registration in the program.

Transfer Credit
Acceptance of transfer credits from approved institutions depends on the relevance of the work to the M.P.A. program. Requests for transfer credits should be made at the time of admission. Transfer credit is limited to 6 credits in which the student earned a minimum grade of “B.” Students may use the petition process to transfer more than 6 credits. Credits older than seven years may not be transferred to the graduate program.

Non-Degree Credit
A maximum of 15 credits earned in the non-degree status will be accepted toward the M.P.A. degree requirements provided the grades earned are “B” or better.

Admission Requirements for International Students
A graduate of a college or university outside of the United States who has completed an academic program equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to the M.P.A. program. All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

An international applicant for whom English is a second language is required to submit a score of 550 (CBT-213) or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before enrolling for courses. Applicants must write to Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08540, or visit www.ets.org/toefl for assistance.

Academic Standing
Continuation in the M.P.A. program requires satisfactory progress toward degree completion. Evidence of such progress includes maintenance of a “B” average each semester. No grade below “C” will be counted toward the degree.

Students who fall below the “B” average will be placed on academic probation. Failure to regain an overall cumulative “B” average within two successive semesters following the one in which the deficiency first occurred will result in dismissal.

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Degree Requirements
The faculty of the College will recommend awarding the Master of Public Administration degree when the following requirements have been met:

1. Completion of 42 credits of approved coursework with no grade below “C,” and with a minimum average grade of “B” (3.0 on a 4.0 scale). This work must include the 30-credit M.P.A. core and 12 additional credits of approved study.

2. Completion of 10 core courses from the following curriculum areas:

Overview
Introduction to Public
Administration
PAD 6053*
3
Public Organization Theory
Organizations and Administrative
Behavior or
PAD 6106
Organizational Change and
Public Management
PAD 6154
3
Public Financial Management
Seminar in Public
Budgeting Techniques or
PAD 6227
Seminar in Public Financial
Administration
PAD 6207
3
Public Personnel
Seminar in Public Personnel
Administration or
PAD 6417
Labor Relations in Government PAD 6427
3
Public Policy
Public Administration and
Public Policy or
PAD 6036
Seminar in Administrative
Policy Making
PAD 6035
3
Analytical Techniques
Applied Methods 1 PAD 6701**
3
Analytical Methods
Applied Methods 2 or PAD 6706***
Program Review and Analysis PAD 6327***
3
Law and Procedures
Administrative Law
and Procedures or
PAD 6605
Regulation PAD 6612
3
Ethics and Democratic Values
Administrative Ethics or PAD 6436
Democratic Values and
Public Administration
PAD 6042
3
Capstone Course
Capstone Seminar in
Public Administration
PAD 6139****
3
Total
30

* This course must be taken within the first 12 credits of the student’s program.
** Undergraduate statistics is a prerequisite for Applied Methods 1.
*** Applied Methods 1 is the prerequisite for Applied Methods 2 and Program Review and Analysis.
**** The capstone course can be taken only by students who have been accepted into the M.P.A. program. The course must be taken in the last semester of the student’s program.

3. Completion of the remaining 12 credits in either the general course of study or a focused area of interest. Students may focus their elective courses in nonprofit management and public procurement.

There is a 3-credit internship course requirement for preservice students, those with little or no formal work experience in the public sector. Consistent with College policy, students who already have a master’s degree from an accredited institution may earn the M.P.A. degree after completion of 36 credits.

Executive Certificate in Public Administration

This certificate is specifically designed for career government employees. The program consists of five graduate courses in public administration:

Introduction to Public
Administration
PAD 6053*
3
Organizations and Administrative
Behavior
PAD 6106
3
Seminar in Public
Budgeting Techniques
PAD 6227
3
Seminar in Public Personnel Administration PAD 6417
3
Administrative Law
and Procedures or
PAD 6605
Administrative Ethics PAD 6436
3

The five courses must be completed within a three-year period. Students must be registered during the fall or spring terms of each of the academic years they are in the program. Students must complete the program with a GPA of at least 3.0 to be granted the Executive Certificate in Public Administration.

Enrollment in certificate courses is not a guarantee of admission into the Master of Public Administration program. If students wish to continue in the M.P.A. program, they must apply for admission according to University guidelines. If admitted to the M.P.A. program, all five of the certificate courses may be transferred, provided a grade of “B” or above has been earned in each course.

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Executive Certificate in Public Procurement

Graduate students who are currently working in purchasing, students interested in this substantive field or others interested in learning about this critical function of government are encouraged to consider the Executive Certificate in Public Procurement. Completion of this program will provide students with the practical knowledge and advanced skills necessary for seeking careers in public procurement and provide job advancement opportunities for those currently employed in the field. Certificate completion will also satisfy the educational requirements to sit for the Certified Professional Public Buyer (CPPB) or the Certified Public Purchasing Officer (CPPO) designation offered through the Universal Public Purchasing Certification Council.

Program Requirements
Upon successful completion of the five online courses identified below, the student will be awarded the Executive Certificate in Public Procurement. Consistent with the School of Public Administration’s policy, students must earn a minimum grade of “B” in each of the five courses to successfully earn the certification.

Required Courses - 15 credits
Public Procurement Concepts
and Practices
PAD 6855
3
Public Procurement and Project
Management
PAD 6856
3
Public Sector Procurement Law
and Ethics
PAD 6857
3
Public Sector Contract Formulation PAD 6858
3
Public Sector Contract Administration PAD 6859
3


Doctoral Program

Doctor of Philosophy in Public Administration

The School of Public Administration at Florida Atlantic University offers a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Administration with concentrations in Administrative Theory and Inquiry, Public Policy Studies, Organizational Studies and Public Budgeting and Financial Administration. Also, students are allowed to assemble concentrations of their own devising. This doctoral program, while primarily designed to qualify students in research, university teaching and consultation, can accommodate a broad array of career goals and options.

Admission Requirements
Admission into the Ph.D. program will be granted to students of superior ability who have demonstrated a record of previous academic success, good potential for continued success in doctoral studies and a desire to prepare for a career in which scholarship and research are major elements.

Normally an applicant must have earned a master’s degree and must also take the following courses if they have not already taken the equivalents elsewhere:

Introduction to Public
Administration
PAD 6053
3
Public Administration
and Public Policy
PAD 6036
3
Organization and Administrative
Behavior
PAD 6106
3
Seminar in Public Financial
Administration
PAD 6207
3 or
Seminar in Public Budgeting
Techniques
PAD 6227
3

In special situations, students with a bachelor’s degree may be admitted into the doctoral program. In such cases, the applicant must complete the above four courses plus quantitative methods at the graduate level.

Applicants should have a minimum graduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.25 or higher, a combined score of at least 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and a minimum score of 4.5 on the analytical writing section. Official GRE scores must be submitted and an online application form completed. Transcripts and GRE scores should be sent directly to the Graduate College.

In addition to transcripts and GRE scores, the Ph.D. Admissions Committee will need:

1. Three letters of recommendation (especially from academic sources);
2. Résumé;
3. Two samples of academic writing;
4. Statement of intent and interests.

These materials should be sent directly to:

Ph.D. Coordinator,
School of Public Administration
Florida Atlantic University
111 East Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Admission Requirements for International Students
A graduate of a college or university outside of the United States who has completed academic programs equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree and master’s degree may apply for admission to the Ph.D. program. The application deadline for international students interested in the fall semester is February 15; for international students interested in the spring semester, the deadline is August 15. All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

An international applicant for whom English is a second language is required to submit a minimum score of 580 or better (CBT-237) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before enrolling for courses. Applicants must write to Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08540, or visit www.ets.org/toefl for assistance.

Program Information
1. Competitive stipends are available at $12,000 to $16,000 plus 80 percent to 100 percent tuition reimbursement.

2. Application deadlines are November 1st and March 31st of each year for domestic students, and February 15th and August 15th for international students.

3. Excellent placement record in faculty, research and executive positions upon graduation.

4. The program includes 45 instructional credits and 18 dissertation research credits.

5. Candidates must pass exams in three of the four concentration areas.

6. Candidates must successfully complete and defend a qualifying paper.

7. Candidates are expected to participate in professional practica and colloquia, attend dissertation defenses and conferences and participate in collegial activities.

Helpful links:
Advanced Schedule
Policy on Appeal of Dismissal
Policy Manual
Graduate School Application
Course Descriptions

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Transfer Credits

Acceptance of transfer credits from approved institutions is dependent upon the pertinence of the work to the Ph.D. program. Transfer of credits must occur at the time of admission and is limited to 6 credits subject to the following restrictions:

1. Grades on all transfer credits must be a minimum of “B” (3.0 in a 4.0 grading system).
2. No graduate credit will be allowed for correspondence, extension work or life experience.

Credit Duplication
No credit used for another degree or as a prerequisite may be counted toward the 63 credits in the Ph.D. program.

Time Limitations
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must complete all work within a seven-consecutive-year period after initial registration in the graduate program.

Dismissal
Students may be dismissed from this degree program at any time for cause. Decision rule is a majority vote of the School of Public Administration faculty.

Students may appeal such a dismissal by sending a letter, with supporting documentation, to the director of the School, who will place it on the agenda of the next faculty meeting providing the letter is received at least four days prior to that meeting.

Academic Standing
Continuation in the graduate program requires satisfactory progress toward the graduate degree. Evidence of such progress includes maintenance of a 3.25 cumulative average throughout the course of academic study. In addition, only grades of “A,” “A-," “B+” and “B” are acceptable in fulfilling graduate school requirements in the Ph.D. plan of study.

Students who do not maintain the required 3.25 cumulative GPA will be placed on academic probation in the semester immediately following the semester in which the cumulative GPA drops below 3.25.

Failure to regain a 3.25 cumulative average within two successive semesters following the semester in which the deficiency first occurred can result in dismissal. The faculty of the School of Public Administration reserves the right to dismiss any student at any time when in its judgment the student is not making satisfactory progress toward completion of the degree. The School of Public Administration Ph.D. Manual describes this and other Ph.D. program policies in full.

Financial Assistance
There are a number of assistantships and fee waivers available for full-time students. Interested students should obtain information on financial assistance from the Ph.D. coordinator. For information regarding admissions, degree requirements and financial aid, contact Public Administration for a Ph.D. Manual and application materials:

Ph.D. Coordinator
School of Public Administration
111 E. Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

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School of Social Work

Faculty:
Hawkins, M., Director; Alperin, D.; Ambris, E.; Amey, B.; Barsky, A.; Choi, J. J.; DeRigne, L.; Diaz, N.; Dybicz, P.; Frizzell, A. C.; Green, D.; Hamlin, E.; Hawkins, W.; Horton, G.; Hutton, B.; Kane, M.; Kaplan, A.; Martinez, P.; McClellan, J.; Park, J.; Platt, K.; Ryan, E.; Weinschenk, S.

Mission
The mission of the Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work program is to serve the region, state and nation by preparing competent and effective professional social workers at the beginning level (B.S.W.) and advanced level (M.S.W.) who will contribute to the implementation and development of social work knowledge and provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems. This mission is appropriate to the Council on Social Work Education’s (CSWE) Policy, Section 1.1, in that the program prepares competent and effective leaders who have the ability to implement and develop social work knowledge and enhance social service delivery systems.

Specific details and requirements may be found at www.fau.edu/ssw.

Bachelor of Social Work/Link to Master's Program
(Minimum of 120 credits required)

Goals
The program’s goals are derived from the School’s mission as detailed above. The goals specifically recognize the social work profession’s history, purposes and philosophy as well as its knowledge, values and skills. The B.S.W. program goals are:

1. Prepare ethical, competent and caring B.S.W. graduates for beginning-level social work practice based on integration of social work knowledge, values and skills.
2. Prepare competent and effective graduates to join in public service that enhances the health and social well-being of the people of South Florida, the state and the nation.

Admission Requirements
Admission requirements for the Social Work program include completion of the general education requirements and fulfillment of the following prerequisites (required by all social work programs statewide):

Human Biology (BSC 1005, BSC 1010,
BSC 1085, BSC 2010,
BSC 2085 or PCB 2099)
3
General Psychology (PSY 1012 , PSY 2012 or PSY 2020) 3
Introductory Sociology (SYG 1000, SYG 2000 or
SYG 2010)
3
United States Government (POS 1041, POS 2041,
POS 2042 or PUP 2099)
3
Introduction to Micro or Macroeconomics (ECO 1000, ECO 2000, ECO 2013, ECO 2023 or ECO 3040) 3

If students are admitted without these courses, they must complete the deficiencies early in their junior year.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
The Social Work program consists of 39 credits of required social work courses, including Field Education, and 21 credits of electives for a total of 60 credits. Ample opportunity exists for each student to select those courses that support their field of practice interests.

Class Requirements

1. Students are required to meet with an academic advisor during SOW 3302 and to submit a Program Sheet.

2. Students are required to attend the first day of any SOW-prefixed course. If a student misses the first day of classes for any reason, he or she may be administratively withdrawn from the course.

3. A 2.5 FAU GPA is required for enrollment in Practice I, Practice II, Practice III and Field (SOW 4300, SOW 4313, SOW 4343 and SOW 4510).

Prerequisite Coursework

1. Students are required to satisfy prerequisite coursework either prior to or during the B.S.W. program. Guidelines for the prerequisites are as follows:

  • American National Government: This requirement may be satisfied with an introductory Political Science course such as POS 1041, POS 2041, POS 1001 or POS 2112.
  • Economics: This requirement may be satisfied with an introductory course in Macro or Micro Economics such as ECO 2013 or ECO 2023.
  • Biology: This requirement may be satisfied with an introductory class in Biology. The recommended class is Life Science, BSC1000 or BSC1005. BSC 2085, Anatomy and Physiology, is acceptable, as well as a Human Biology course.
  • General Psychology: This requirement is satisfied with an introductory class in Psychology. At FAU, the course is PSY 1012.
  • Intro to Sociology: This requirement is satisfied with an introductory class in Sociology. At FAU, the course is SYG 1000.

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Required Social Work Core Coursework

1. The student is advised to speak to an academic advisor about specific courses and the order in which to take them.

2. By the time a student has completed SOW 4300, the student must have completed all prerequisites and general education/IFP requirements.

3. Students must complete each SOW-prefixed course with a grade of "C" or better. A grade of "C-" will not be counted as credit toward the Social Work degree. Any core course with a grade of "C-" or lower must be retaken.

4. All degree requirements must be completed before a student is eligible for SOW 4510, Field Education in Social Work. This means that the student must have completed the Foreign Language Admission requirement, Gordon Rule requirements, all General Education requirements as well as all Social Work courses. The student must also have an FAU GPA of 2.5 in order to enter Field Education. A satisfactory grade in Field Education is required to receive the Social Work degree.

5. Statistics, STA 2023, is not a prerequisite course but is required for graduation.

Approved Elective Coursework

1. Students are advised to select approved elective coursework from the pre-approved set of electives listed in this catalog. Any SOW course that is not counted as part of the SOW Core or SOW Elective sections may count as approved elective credit with a grade of "C" or better. Any deviation from the courses requires approval.

2. Students who have met the college admissions criteria and SOW prerequisites transferring from another degree program into the B.S.W. with upper-division credits may transfer up to 21 credits of 3000- and 4000-level credits; 6 credits of these must be pre-approved. This provision ensures that every SOW graduate will have obtained a minimum of 39 credits of either SOW-prefixed or faculty pre-approved elective coursework.

Free Elective Coursework

1. This section is satisfied with 1000- to 4000-level college or University coursework not previously counted as credit toward the 120-hour SOW degree.

2. Students must complete 15 credits of free electives with a maximum of 6 credits (2 courses) at the 1000 level.

3. Free electives may be used to fulfill FAU Admissions, Foreign Language, Gordon Rule, General Education and/or SOW pre requisite deficiencies.

SOW Field Experience

1. All prerequisite coursework and general education/IFP requirements must be completed two semesters prior to beginning field internship.

2. All SOW majors must satisfy the Field Education requirement, SOW 4510. Students must meet certain requirements to be eligible to enroll in Field Education. Students must complete all admission, general education and Gordon Rule requirements prior to eligibility. Field Education may only be taken at the end of the student's coursework.

3. Students should consult with an academic coordinator or the Director of Field Education Programs to discuss eligibility for entrance to Field Education. Students must attend an orientation session regarding Field Education and complete appropriate paperwork.

Students Transferring with Upper-Division Credits

1. Students may transfer up to 21credits of upper-division elective credits into the approved elective section and free elective section. However, 6 credits must come from a pre-approved list of electives.

2. Students who have completed SOW credits at another institution may bring these credits into their program at the discretion of the SOW faculty. FAU requires that the last 30 credits of upper-division courses be completed at FAU to receive a degree from FAU.

Double Major and Dual Degree

1. Students pursuing a double major must satisfy the SOW prerequisites, 39 credits of SOW coursework, 6 credits of pre-approved elective coursework and 15 credits of free electives. A faculty advisor must approve courses that are not related to the field of SOW and are not pre-approved to count as electives. Students must also submit a Double Major form to the Office of the Registrar.

2. Students pursuing a Dual or Second Bachelor degree must meet the University requirement of an additional 30 credits beyond a 120-credit degree program. For a Second Bachelor in SOW, the student must satisfy the program prerequisites, 39 credits of SOW coursework and 6 credits of pre-approved electives. During the first week of the last semester of the program, students are required to submit an application for graduation, which notifies FAU of their intent to graduate and begins the process of degree approval. It also enables the graduate to receive commencement ticket information.

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A minimum grade of “C” is required for all SOW-prefixed courses. If a grade below “C” (such as “C-”) is earned in a SOW-prefixed course, the course will not count toward any portion of the minimum 120-credit degree program.

All social work courses must be completed within the five-year period prior to graduation. (For example, students enrolled in Field in fall 2010 must have begun core social work coursework no earlier than fall 2005.)

Social Work Major Requirements - 39 credits
Introductory Statistics or
Intermediate Statistics
STA 2023 or STA 3163
3
Social Welfare Policy and
Provisions
SOW 3232
3
Profession of Social Work SOW 3302
3
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 1
SOW 4101
3
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 2
SOW 4102
3
Social Work Practice 1 SOW 4300+
3
Social Work Practice 2 SOW 4313*+
3
Social Work Practice 3 SOW 4343*+
3
Research Methods in Social Work SOW 4403**
3
Field Education in Social Work SOW 4510***
12

* SOW 4300 is the prerequisite.
** A statistics course, such as STA 2023, is recommended prior to SOW 4403.
*** See the director of Field Education Internships.
+ Students must have a minimum FAU GPA of 2.5 to enroll.
Note: SOW 3232 and 3302 must be completed with a “C” or better prior to SOW 4300. SOW 4101 and 4102 may be completed prior to or concurrently with SOW 4300. These five courses are prerequisites for SOW 4313 and SOW 4343.

Social Work Elective - 3 credits from the following
Family Violence SOW 4141
3
Issues in Counseling Women SOW 4357
3
Minority Issues and Social Work SOW 4620
3
Social Work With Aging Populations SOW 4643
3
Child Welfare SOW 4650
3
Social Work Practice with Vulnerable
Children and Families
SOW 4654
3
Social Work with
Substance Abusers
SOW 4700
3
Spiritual Dimensions of Social Work Practice SOW 4844
3
Special Topics SOW 4930
3

Note: SOW 2025 may not be used as a Social Work elective and is closed to upper-level Social Work majors.

Field Education Requirements
The social work student is assigned to a community-based social service agency during the last semester of the B.S.W. program to fulfill Field Education requirements. To be eligible for Field Education, a student must have completed all other degree requirements including fulfilling all of the social work courses’ prerequisites, having a minimum FAU GPA of 2.5, having a “C” or better in all required social work courses and having no “I” (incomplete) grades.

Academic credit for previous work experience will not be given in lieu of the Field Education internship. Students found to be out of compliance with the NASW Code of Ethics will not be permitted to enter the field. Prior to applying to Field Education, students must exhibit appropriate professional behavior in the academic setting.

Students must apply for Field Education online by the 4th Friday of the semester prior to when they want to enter the field. They must also attend a field orientation on campus the semester prior to entering the field and meet individually with field faculty. See www.fau.edu/ssw for complete eligibility criteria.

Field Education involves approximately 30 hours per week of generalist practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and attendance at a two-hour per week integrative seminar. Due to the limited number of agencies that can provide evening and weekend hours for internships, the School of Social Work cannot guarantee that an appropriate internship can be found unless students can devote weekday daytime hours (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to their internships. Students who do not have weekday hours may be required to complete their internship over two semesters.

Criminal background checks and/or substance abuse testing may be required by the field agency prior to or during Field Education. Prior criminal history, limited daytime hours and/or positive substance abuse test results can jeopardize placement in a field internship, and the student may be unable to obtain a social work degree. Students who receive a positive substance abuse test result will be mandated to have a substance abuse assessment at the FAU Student Counseling Center and will be required to comply with any recommendations if they wish to continue in the social work program.

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Electives (21 credits)
Three credits must come from Group 1. Three credits must come from Group 2. The remaining 15 elective credits may be chosen from other disciplines of study in consultation with an advisor.

Elective Group 1: Community and Society Analysis Electives. Choose a minimum of one course (3 credits) from the following:
Criminal Justice
Criminology CCJ 3014
3
The Criminal Justice System CCJ 3024
3
Victimology CCJ 3666
3
Juvenile Justice CJJ 4010
3
Health Administration
Health Delivery Systems HSA 4111
3
Issues and Trends in Health Care HSA 4113
3
Political Science
Women and the Law POS 3693
3
Florida Politics and
Government
POS 4182
3
The U.S. Congress POS 4424
3
Constitutional Law 1 POS 4603
3
Policy Making
and Administration
PUP 4004
3
Policy Analysis PUP 4008
3
Sociology
Any SYD, SYO or SYP courses.
Elective Group 2: Human Behavior, Administrative Processes and Organizational Behavior Electives. Choose a minimum of one course (3 credits) from the following:
Communication
Writing for Management ENC 3213
3
Intercultural Communication SPC 3710
3
History
History of U.S. Women AMH 3560
3
African American History to 1877 AMH 3571
3
African American History since 1877 AMH 3572
3
American Indian History AMH 4580
3
Modern Latin American History LAH 3200
3
Nursing
Women, Witches and Healing NUR 4176
3
Issues in Women’s Health Care NUR 4495
3
Psychology
Abnormal Psychology CLP 4144
3
Personality Theories PPE 4003
3
Psychology of Women SOP 3742
3
Public Administration
Public Management and
Administration
PAD 3003
3
Organizational Behavior and Administrative Communication PAD 3104
3
Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations PAD 4203
3
State and Local Government
Administration
PAD 4806
3
Urban and Regional Planning
Planning and Growth Mgmt. URP 3000
3
Planning Implementation Strategies URP 4120
3

The above electives are strongly recommended. Any deviation should be made in consultation with an advisor.

Free Electives (15 credits)

Review Committee Policy
The School of Social Work is committed to ensuring the integrity of its degree program and the certifiability of its majors as future social workers. To this end, the School has established a review committee to address difficulties by which a student’s academic progression in the field may be hindered. Complete information regarding the review committee is found online at www.fau.edu/ssw.

Second Bachelor’s in Social Work
A second bachelor’s in Social Work requires 39 credits, including 36 credits of social work core courses and 3 credits of social work electives. All prerequisites must be met the semester prior to entering the field.

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Aging Certificate

Undergraduate Social Work majors interested in working with elders may do so through the School of Social Work’s Aging Certificate. Completion of this program will provide students with a specific knowledge and skill base for a range of job opportunities with a diverse elder population. To apply for this program, contact the School of Social Work at 561-297-3234. Students may also refer to www.fau.edu/ssw

Program Requirements
A student may earn the Aging Certificate upon completion of the following:

1. Be currently enrolled in the Bachelor of Social Work degree at FAU;
2. The 3-credit course Social Work with Aging Populations (SOW 4643);
3. Two additional, approved 3-credit courses in the Aging Certificate Program;
4. One B.S.W. field internship, approved by the School of Social Work, with specialized service outreach to diverse elders.

Child Welfare Certificate
The School of Social Work offers an undergraduate Certificate in Child Welfare, limited to Social Work majors. The certificate provides a foundation of knowledge in practice, policy and programs that impact the lives of vulnerable children. Students develop skills in areas relevant to children’s services, including substance abuse and family violence. To apply for this program, contact the School of Social Work at 561-297-3234. Students may also refer to www.fau.edu/ssw

Program Requirements
A student may earn the Child Welfare Certificate by completing:

1. Child Welfare (SOW 4650), 3 credits;
2. Social Work with Vulnerable Children and Families (SOW 4654), 3 credits;
3. One bachelor-level field education internship (SOW 4510) with the Department of Children and Families (DCF) or a private agency approved by the School of Social Work that has contracted with DCF to provide the same child protection services as the public agency;
4. Be currently enrolled in the Bachelor of Social Work degree at FAU.

Master’s Program

Master of Social Work

Goals

The goals are derived from the mission of preparing competent and effective professional social workers at the M.S.W. (advanced level) who will contribute to the implementation and development of social work knowledge and provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems. The program goals specifically recognize the social work profession’s history, purposes and philosophy as well as its knowledge, values and skills. The M.S.W. program goals are:

1. Prepare M.S.W. graduates for advanced work in clinical-community practice by teaching knowledge, skills and values for social work practice with children, adolescents and families; adults and families; and elders and families in resolving or preventing social problems within the context of the community, state and nation.

2. Prepare M.S.W. graduates for leadership positions in social service agencies in South Florida.

3. Prepare competent and effective advanced graduates for autonomous independent social work practice.

4. Prepare graduates for lifelong learning and an appreciation for maintaining currency of the social work knowledge, values and skills in their practice.

The student will acquire a foundation of theoretical knowledge, practice skills and professional values necessary for delivering quality social work services. Additionally, the student will acquire an advanced level of knowledge and skill in the concentration of clinical-community. Clinical-community practice refers to an integrated approach to social work assessment and intervention in which practitioners use a variety of advanced theories for understanding and practice at the macro, mezzo and micro levels. Within the clinical-community concentration, students will select from one of the following focus areas: children, adolescents and families; adults and families; or elders and families. Coursework focuses on practice, social welfare history and policy, human behavior and the social environment, research, advanced practice and field education. The M.S.W. curriculum provides the opportunity to meet the educational requirements for licensure in the State of Florida as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker.

Admission Requirements
An undergraduate degree from an accredited institution is required for admission. No particular undergraduate major is required, but a broad liberal arts preparation is essential. While a major in Social Work is seen as desirable, other undergraduate majors are given equal consideration for the two-year program. A grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher in the last 60 credits of undergraduate coursework is required. In addition to the University application, M.S.W. applicants must also submit the social work application, a personal statement, three recommendations (on School of Social Work forms) and a current résumé. Meeting minimal standards does not guarantee admission. The total application packet will be considered in making admission decisions.

If accepted for admission into the M.S.W. program, all incoming students are required to attend an M.S.W. orientation conducted during the week prior to the beginning of the fall term. Failure to attend this orientation session will result in admission deferment to the following year.

Students not admitted to the M.S.W. program will not be permitted to take SOW courses. Exceptions may be made for individuals with L.C.S.W. from out of state who need to satisfy Florida licensing requirements. Permission must be granted by M.S.W. Program Coordinator.

Admission Requirements for Advanced Standing Students
The Advanced Standing Program is available to a limited number of applicants who have completed their Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree within the last five years. The B.S.W. must have been earned from a Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)-accredited program.

Applicants must meet previously stated admission requirements and have a GPA of 3.5 or better in the last 60 credits of undergraduate coursework. Also, one of the letters of recommendation must be an outstanding recommendation from the student’s program director of Field Education. Students admitted to this program will follow the Advanced Year Curriculum, which consists of 30 credits, plus a 3-credit Transition course.

Applicants are required to successfully pass (a grade of “B” or higher) the 3-credit Transition Course (SOW 6693). This course is intended to assist applicants in transitioning from undergraduate B.S.W.-level coursework to graduate-level M.S.W. coursework. The course is offered prior to the fall semester of admission. Applicants may be conditionally accepted in the Advanced Standing Program prior to successfully completing the transition course.

Applicants who take the transition course and are not accepted into the Advanced Standing Program may drop the course in accordance with University policy. Applicants should consult the Academic Calendar regarding withdrawal and fee-liability deadlines.

Undergraduate coursework will be examined by the admissions committee. Meeting minimal standards does not guarantee admission. The total application packet will be considered in making admissions decisions. Highly promising applicants who do not precisely meet the GPA admission requirements may petition the School of Social Work graduate admissions committee for exceptional consideration.

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Admission Requirements for International Students
Graduates of colleges or universities outside of the United States who have completed an academic program equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree may apply for admission. All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to submit a score of 600 or higher (CBT-250 or higher) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before enrolling in coursework. Applicants must write to Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. 08540, or visit www.ets.org/toefl for assistance.

In addition, international applicants must have had previous experience in the social welfare field
in their own countries prior to application to the M.S.W. program.

Lastly, international applicants must also possess and provide a sound financial plan to cover the costs of tuition, living expenses and round-trip transportation, as determined by the Graduate College.

Transfer Credit
Students transferring from another CSWE-accredited M.S.W. program may transfer a maximum of 30 graduate credits for the 60-credit program. No transfer credits are accepted for the Advanced Standing Program. M.S.W. courses completed at other universities must be evaluated as to their relevance and similarity to FAU courses prior to review of the student’s application. All courses that are applied to the degree must have been successfully completed within three years of entrance into the FAU program, and the student must have earned a grade of “B” or above. A grade of “B-” or below does not meet this requirement and is not accepted. No graduate credit is granted for life experience or work experience.

Enrollment in M.S.W. Courses
M.S.W. courses are limited to those students who have been fully admitted to the M.S.W. program. The School of Social Work closely manages its accredited, licensed graduate program to ensure that its students are functioning within cohorts based upon admission year and program type. Non-matriculated students who register for an M.S.W. course will be administratively withdrawn from the course by the School of Social Work. If withdrawn, it is the student’s responsibility to seek any associated fee refunds through other University channels.

Time Limitation
Candidates for the Master of Social Work degree must complete all degree requirements within five consecutive years after initial registration.

Academic Standing
Continuation in the program requires satisfactory progress toward degree completion. Satisfactory progress toward degree completion includes, but is not limited to, consecutive registration according to curriculum and program structure and achieving minimum academic standards as determined by the cumulative grade point average. Minimum academic standards are evidenced by maintaining a 3.0 cumulative GPA, with no grade below a “C.” Students must have a 3.0 GPA to graduate.

60-Credit Program Students
Students admitted to the regular 60-credit program will be allowed no more than two “C”s during their program. Students enrolled in this program who earn less than a “B” (3.0) average will be placed on academic probation. Failure to regain a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative GPA within one semester following the one in which the deficiency occurred will result in dismissal.

Advanced Standing Students
Students admitted with advanced standing will be allowed no more than one “C” during the program. Advanced standing students earning less than a “B” (3.0) average will be placed on academic probation. Failure to regain a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative GPA within one semester following the one in which the deficiency occurred will result in dismissal.

Grades below “C”
Grades below “C” (e.g., “C-” to “F”) reflect unsatisfactory progress toward the degree. Students earning such grades are therefore subject to dismissal from the Master of Social Work degree program. Students may also be dismissed at any time if they are not making satisfactory progress toward completion of the degree.

Enrollment in M.S.W. Courses
All students enrolled in the M.S.W. program are required to attend the first class in all M.S.W. courses.

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Thesis Option
The School of Social Work offers a thesis option in the Advanced Curriculum. This option requires that a student identify a professor prior to the beginning of the fall semester who will work with the student. The student will enroll in SOW 6971, Thesis Proposal, during the fall semester. Following the development of a research proposal, the student will submit it to FAU’s institutional review board. During the spring semester, the student will enroll in SOW 6979, Thesis Research. The student will then implement the proposal, write a thesis and defend it in an oral examination.

Degree Requirements
The Master of Social Work degree is a two-year, 60-credit program. It is designed for full-time or planned part-time students. Full-time students take 15 credits each semester, which includes coursework within the classroom and a field practicum.

The M.S.W. contains two program options: the regular 60-credit program and the Advanced Standing Program. The regular 60-credit program consists of the Foundation Year Curriculum (30 credits) and the Advanced Year Curriculum (30 credits). The Advanced Standing Program consists of the Advanced Year Curriculum (30 credits). In addition to these program options, students may enroll either full-time or part-time. Students designate the program for which they are applying. Requests for changes after being admitted must be made in writing and approved by the M.S.W. coordinator. Program options and associated academic progression are configured as follows:

The Regular M.S.W. Program (60 credits). Students may enroll and progress as either:
Full-time—graduate within two years of initial program registration; or
Part-time—graduate within four years of initial program registration.

The Advanced Standing Program (30 credits). Students may enroll and progress as either:
Full-time—graduate within two semesters of initial program registration; or
Part-time—graduate within two years of initial program registration.

The full- and part-time Master of Social Work degree is designed as follows:

Full-Time Regular Program - Two-year program, 60 credits
First Year - Fall Semester

Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 1
SOW 6105
3
Social Welfare History and Policy SOW 6235
3
Generalist Social Work Practice
with Individuals
SOW 6305
3
Generalist Social Work Practice with
Organizations and Communities
SOW 6306
3
Field Instruction/Integrative Seminar 1 SOW 6532
3
First Year - Spring Semester
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 2
SOW 6106
3
Human Diversity or Ethical Issues in Contemporary Social Work Practice SOW 6132 or SOW 6296
3
Generalist Social Work Practice
with Families and Groups
SOW 6324
3
Social Work Research SOW 6404
3
Field Instruction/Integrative
Seminar 2
SOW 6533
3
Second Year - Fall Semester
Psychopathology in Clinical
Practice
SOW 6125
3
Advanced Evaluation for Social
Work Practice
SOW 6437
3
Advanced Year Field Instruction
and Integrative Seminar 1
SOW 6535
3
Required Population-Based Concentration Course SOW
3
Elective  
3
Second Year - Spring Semester
Administration and Supervision SOW 6377
3
Advanced Year Field Instruction
and Integrative Seminar 2
SOW 6536
3
Required Context of Practice Concentration Course SOW
3
Electives SOW
6
Part-Time Regular Program - Four-year program, 60 credits
Foundation Curriculum Year One
Fall
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 1
SOW 6105
3
Social Welfare History and Policy SOW 6235
3
Spring
Human Diversity or Ethical Issues in Contemporary Social Work Practice SOW 6132 or SOW 6296
3
Social Work Research SOW 6404
3
Summer
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment 2
SOW 6106
3
Generalist Social Work Practice with
Organizations and Communities
SOW 6306
3
Foundation Curriculum Year Two
Fall
Generalist Social Work Practice
with Individuals
SOW 6305
3
Field Instruction/Integrative
Seminar 1
SOW 6532
3
Spring  
Generalist Social Work Practice
with Families and Groups
SOW 6324
3
Field Instruction/Integrative
Seminar 2
SOW 6533
3
Advanced Curriculum Year Three
Fall
Psychopathology in Clinical
Practice
SOW 6125
3
Advanced Evaluation for Social
Work Practice
SOW 6437
3
Spring
Administration and Supervision SOW 6377
3
Elective SOW
3
Summer
Electives (2) SOW
6
Advanced Curriculum Year Four
Fall
Advanced Year Field Instruction and
Integrative Seminar 1
SOW 6535
3
Required Population-Based
Concentration Course
SOW
3
Spring
Advanced Year Field Instruction and
Integrative Seminar 2
SOW 6536
3
Required Context of Practice
Concentration Course
SOW
3
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Full-Time Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Year Curriculum - 30 Credits
Fall
Psychopathology in Clinical
Practice
SOW 6125
3
Advanced Evaluation for Social
Work Practice
SOW 6437
3
Advanced Year Field Instruction and
Integrative Seminar 1
SOW 6535
3
Required Population-Based Concentration Course SOW
3
Elective SOW
3
Spring
Administration and Supervision SOW 6377
3
Advanced Year Field Instruction
and Integrative Seminar 2
SOW 6536
3
Required Context of Practice Concentration Course SOW
3
Electives (2) SOW
6
Part-Time Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Year Curriculum - 30 Credits
First Year - Fall
Psychopathology in Clinical
Practice
SOW 6125
3
Advanced Evaluation for Social
Work Practice
SOW 6437
3
First Year - Spring
Administration and Supervision SOW 6377
3
Elective SOW
3
First Year - Summer Semester (Summer 2 and 3)
Electives (2) SOW
6
Second Year - Fall
Advanced Year Field Instruction and
Integrative Seminar 1
SOW 6535
3
Required Population-Based Concentration Course SOW
3
Second Year - Spring
Advanced Year Field Instruction
and Integrative Seminar 2
SOW 6536
3
Required Context of Practice Concentration Course SOW
3
Required Concentration Course Selections
Advanced Social Work Practice and Policy
with Children and Families
SOW 6243
3
Advanced Theory and Practice with
Adults and Family
SOW 6348
3
Advanced Context of Social Work Practice with Adults and Elders
(New title effective spring 2012.)
SOW 6605
3
Advanced Social Work Practice
with Elders
SOW 6646
3
Advanced Theory and Practice with
Children and Adolescents
SOW 6655
3
Electives*  
6
SOW courses may be used to fulfill any elective credit requirement above. Students may select from among the following courses:
Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Techniques for Social Work SOW 6128
Conflict Resolution SOW 6158
Advanced Social Work Practice and Policy with Children and Families SOW 6243
Ethical Issues in Contemporary
Social Work Practice
SOW 6296
Advanced Theory and Practice with
Adults and Family
SOW 6348
Advanced Context of Social Work Practice
with Adults and Elders
(New title effective spring 2012.)
SOW 6605
Advanced Social Work Practice and Policy in Mental Health Settings SOW 6606
Social Work and Spirituality SOW 6626
Advanced Social Work Practice with Elders SOW 6646
Social Work Practice with Vulnerable
Children and Families
SOW 6653
Advanced Theory and Practice with
Children and Adolescents
SOW 6655
Child Welfare SOW 6656
Loss and Grief: Individual, Family and
Cultural Perspectives
SOW 6678
Intervention in the Field of Addictions SOW 6712
Special Topics SOW 6930
Study Abroad SOW 6957

* Electives can be taken outside the College with permission from the M.S.W. program coordinator. A syllabus must be provided for review.

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Field Education Requirements

Prior to applying to Field Education, students must exhibit appropriate professional behavior in the academic setting. Students found to be out of compliance with the NASW Code of Ethics will not be permitted to enter the field. Academic credit for previous work experience will not be given in lieu of the Field Education internship.

Students must apply for Field Education online by the 4th Friday of the semester prior to when they want to enter the field. They must also attend a field orientation on campus the semester prior to entering the field and meet individually with field faculty. See www.fau.edu/ssw for complete eligibility criteria.

The internship for Foundation students involves 16 hours per week of generalist practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and attendance at a two-hour per week integrative seminar. The internship for Advanced Standing/Concentration students consists of approximately 27 hours per week of advanced clinical practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and attendance at a two-hour per week integrative seminar. Part-time students have the option to begin their internship at the beginning of Summer 3 and complete 16 hours per week through the following spring semester.

Due to the limited number of agencies that can provide evening and weekend hours for internships, the School of Social Work cannot guarantee that an appropriate internship can be found unless Foundation students can devote weekday-daytime hours (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to their internships.

Criminal background checks and/or substance abuse testing may be required by the field agency prior to or during Field Education. Prior criminal history, limited daytime hours and/or positive substance abuse test results can jeopardize placement in a field internship and the student may be unable to obtain a social work degree. M.S.W. students with any type of felony conviction will not be placed in an internship. Any student who receives a positive substance abuse test result will be mandated to have a substance abuse assessment at the FAU Student Counseling Center and will be required to comply with any recommendations if they wish to continue in the social work program.

Aging Certificate

With the continuing increase in aging populations in Florida and throughout the United States, the delivery of social work services for diverse groups of elders will become increasingly critical. Service needs currently exist and will continue to develop along a continuum of care in public, private-not-for-profit and private-for-profit settings. In response to these evolving needs, The School of Social Work developed a certificate program to ensure that there are competently prepared, master’s-level social workers to meet the biopsychosocial and spiritual needs of South Florida’s diverse elder populations. This certificate program is open only to M.S.W. students.

Program Requirements
1. SOW 6646, Advanced Social Work Practice with Elders;
2. Two approved SOW graduate-level courses related to practice with elders;
3. One master’s-level Field Education placement (6 credits) specializing in service outreach to diverse elders;
4. A Master of Social Work degree.

Child Welfare Certificate
The graduate-level Child Welfare Certificate Program, open only to students enrolled in the School of Social Work, prepares students for a career in working with abused or neglected children and their families. The certificate program provides a foundation of knowledge in practice, policy and programs that impact vulnerable children’s lives. Students develop practice skills in areas relevant to children’s services, including substance abuse and family violence. Depending on funding, internships may be available. Call 561-297-3234 for information.

Program Requirements
1. Six credits of SOW courses that focus on child welfare;
2. Six credits of master’s level Field Education placements (SOW 6535 and SOW 6536) with the Department of Children and Families (DCF) or a private agency approved by the School of Social Work that has contracted with the DCF to provide the same child protection services as the public agency;
3. Completion of a Master of Social Work degree.

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School of Urban and Regional Planning

Faculty:
Vos, J., Director; Esnard, A.; Li, Y.; Mitsova, D.; Oner, A. C.; Polakit, K.; Prosperi, D. C.

Mission
The School of Urban and Regional Planning is a locus of scholars, teachers, practitioners, agents and students committed to the continuous improvement of urban regions and the planning enterprise through research, teaching and service.

The School provides an environment to discuss, develop and disseminate new ideas and concepts and contribute to the practice of planning directed toward a future that is environmentally, economically and humanly beneficial. The focus of work relies on the recognition and use of multi-scalar connections and interactions of systems and planning activities. The School encourages involvement in a range of governance activities, including policy framework development, participatory decision-making and community stewardship. It also seeks to exploit the potential of emerging technologies and collaborative engagement in creative and innovative ways.

Current initiatives include global urban networks, climate change, metropolitan form, disaster management, place making, healthy cities and housing market issues.

Information

Students who seek additional information should contact the School of Urban and Regional Planning at 954-762-5652.

Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning/Link to Master's Program/Link to Combined Bachelor/Master's Program
(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Bachelor Urban and Regional Planning (B.U.R.P.) is a professional program that provides students with the knowledge base and analytical and design skills to address issues that affect the quality of life in neighborhoods, suburbs, cities and regions. The curriculum consists of planning lecture courses, design courses and professional practice courses that give students real-world planning experience. Students select courses from a wide variety of electives that allow them to focus on topics of particular interest. Graduates of the program qualify for positions in a variety of public and private organizations, including local and state planning departments, nonprofit organizations and private-sector planning and development firms.

Admission Requirements
All students must meet minimum admission requirements of the University. Please refer to the Admissions section of this catalog for a more detailed discussion.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
All students in the Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning program must complete a minimum of 120 credits, including the following:

1. Satisfaction of all University requirements for baccalaureate degrees;
2. The last 30 upper-division credits (3000/4000-level courses) must be earned in residence at FAU;
3. 39 credits of Planning Core courses;
4. 6 credits of approved upper-division electives;
5. 15 credits of free electives;
6. An internship (as part of the Planning Core) of 3 credits;
7. A minimum grade of “C” is required for each core course.

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Urban and Regional Planning Program

Planning Core Courses - 39 credits
Planning and Growth Management URP 3000
3
Planning Methods URP 4011
3
City Structure and Change URP 4055
3
Planning Implementation Strategies URP 4120
3
Public Budgeting and Finance PAD 4223
3
Introduction to Visual
Planning Technology
URP 4254
3
Plan Making and Design URP 4343
3
Sustainable Cities URP 4403
3
Capital Facilities Planning URP 4730
3
Site Planning URP 4870
3
Planning Design Studio URP 4920
3
Planning Practice URP 4945
3
Planning Project URP 4979*
3

* URP 4979 is designed for students approaching the completion of their program.

Elective Courses - 6 credits
Students must select two upper-division electives appropriate to their field of study. Below is a list of suggested electives.
American Environmental History AMH 3630
3
Community Service Systems CCJ 3126
3
Economics of the Public Sector ECO 4504
3
Urban and Regional Economics ECP 3603
3
Environmental Economics ECP 4302
3
Environmental Issues in Atmospheric
and Earth Science
EVR 3019
3
Tourism and Commercial Recreation GEO 4542
3
Introduction to Mapping and GIS GIS 3015C
3
Remote Sensing of Environment GIS 4035C
3
Coastal and Marine Sciences GLY 3731
3
Earth Systems and Resources GLY 4012C
3
Public Management and
Administration
PAD 3003
3
Managing for Excellence in the Public
and Nonprofit Sectors
PAD 4332
3
Administrative Process and Ethics PAD 4604
3
State and Local Government
Administration
PAD 4806
3
Environmental Ethics PHI 3640
3
Law and American Society POS 3691
3
Politics of Community Development PUP 4623
3
Principles of Real Estate REE 3043
3
The Urban Community SYD 4602
3
Environmental Planning Methods URP 4420
3
Urban Development Planning Methods URP 4546
3
Free Electives - 15 credits

Second Bachelor’s in Urban and Regional Planning
A second bachelor’s in Urban and Regional Planning requires 39 credits of urban and regional planning core courses.

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Bachelor of Urban Design
(effective fall 2011)
(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Bachelor of Urban Design (B.U.D.) program provides a broad knowledge of the principles and practices of urban design. It is ideal for students who are interested in design of the built environment at the neighborhood, community and city scale, with an emphasis on sustainable development. The program offers an interdisciplinary approach for students who plan to pursue a professional career in an urban discipline, such as urban and regional planning, urban development policy, real estate development, municipal and planning law, as well as design disciplines, including architecture and landscape architecture at the graduate level.

The program utilizes the South Florida metropolitan region as an "urban living laboratory" for the students to exercise their urban design creativity, but also covers national and global context.  Students’ experience will also benefit from partnerships forged between the BUD program and practitioners from private design and consulting firms in the South Florida metropolitan area, with both local and international experience.

Admission Requirements
All students must meet minimum admission requirements of the University. Please refer to the Admissions section of this catalog for a more detailed discussion.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transfer Student Manual (see www.fau.edu/registrar/tsm.php).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
The interdisciplinary nature of the program allows students the option to take electives from a variety of different departments and schools. The core courses are offered in the School of Urban and Regional Planning and the School of Architecture. There are three types of core courses: lectures, studio/lab and participation in professional seminars. All students in the Bachelor of Urban Design program must complete a minimum of 120 credits, including the following:

1. Satisfaction of all University requirements for baccalaureate degrees;
2. The last 30 upper division credits (3000/4000-level courses) must be earned in residence at FAU;
3. At least 33 credits of Urban Design Core courses;
4. At least 12 credits of Suggested Elective courses;
5. At least 15 credits of Free Elective courses; and
6. A minimum grade of “C” is required for each ARC- and URP-prefixed course. If a grade below “C,” such as “C-,” is earned in an ARC- and URP-required course, the course will not count toward any portion of the 120-credit program.

The course materials taught in the core courses build upon each other. Therefore, students are highly recommended to follow the term schedules identified below. Following the term schedule is also very important in order to ensure the timely graduation of the students.

Urban Design Core Courses - 33 credits
Fall 1
Planning and Growth Management URP 3000
3
City Structure and Change URP 4055
3
Introduction to Visual Planning Technology URP 4254
3
Spring 1
Site Planning and Engineering ARC 3374
3
Plan Making and Design URP 4343
3
Urban Development Planning Methods URP 4546
3
Fall 2
Designing Safer Communities ARC 4384
3
Pre-Modern Architectural History and Theory ARC 3710
3
Planning Design Studio URP 4920
3
Spring 2
Sustainable Cities URP 4403
3
Planning Project URP 4979
3

Suggested Elective Courses - 12 credits
Planning Methods URP 4011
3
Planning Implementation Strategies URP 4120
3
Environmental Planning Methods URP 4420
3
Directed Independent Study URP 4905
3
Dynamic Design Methods 1 ARC 4057
3
Ethics and Architecture ARC 4202
3
Contemporary Design Theories ARC 4220
3
Architecture and Urbanism Study Abroad ARC 4950
3
American Cultural Landscape GEO 4422
3
Tourism and Commercial Recreation GEO 4542
3
Urban Geography GEO 4602
3
Transportation and Spatial Organization GEO 4700
3
Introduction to Mapping and GIS GIS 3015C
3
Environmental Ethics PHI 3640
3
The Urban Community SYD 4602
3
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector PAD 4144
3
Principles of Real Estate REE 3043
3
Law and American Society POS 3691
3
Politics of Community Development PUP 4623
3
Community Service Systems CCJ 3126
3
Free Electives Course - 15 credits
Free electives are taken in the College for Design and Social Inquiry and/or other FAU Colleges. Students are advised to consider additional courses listed under "Suggested Elective Courses," although other choices are permitted.

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Master’s Program

Master of Urban and Regional Planning

The Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is a fully accredited professional degree designed for individuals interested in careers as urban and/or regional planners. Individuals from a wide variety of undergraduate backgrounds, including architecture, design, applied arts, engineering, humanities, social sciences, geography and urban and environmental studies, are encouraged to apply.

Admission Requirements
Applicants for admission must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. Each applicant should have a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher in the last half of work attempted at the undergraduate level and a combined score of 1000 or higher on the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Exam (only GRE scores from within the last five years will be accepted). All applicants must submit their scores on the GRE, regardless of GPA, as well as a brief personal statement (approximately 500 words).

An international student for whom English is a second language is required to achieve a minimum score of 550 (CBT-213) or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A graduate of a college or university outside of the United States who has completed an academic program equivalent to an American bachelor’s degree may apply for admission. All international applicants whose transcripts are from non-U.S. institutions must have their credentials evaluated course by course, including the GPA, by a professional evaluation service. A service may be found at www.NACES.org.

If an applicant presents either a GPA of 3.0 or higher or a GRE score of 1000 or higher, but not both, that applicant will be considered by the College graduate admissions committee. The committee will review all evidence of high promise, including, but not limited to:

1. Trend of undergraduate grades;
2. Type of undergraduate degree program;
3. Mature work experience;
4. Completion of up to three graduate courses with a “B” or higher in each;
5. Scores upon retaking the Graduate Record Examination;
6. Personal statement.

Degree Requirements
The M.U.R.P. curriculum is a two-year, 48-credit program. It is designed and structured to allow timely completion for both full-time (9-12 credits per semester) and part-time (6 credits per semester) students.

The M.U.R.P. curriculum is structured into four components: core courses (27 credits), areas of specialization (12 credits), electives (6 credits) and synthesis (3 credits).

M.U.R.P. Core Courses
Planning Process and Skills URP 6101 3
Legal Aspects of Planning URP 6131 3
Planimetrics URP 6200 3
Planning Urban Services URP 6251 3
Introduction to GIS in Planning URP 6270 3
Seminar in Urban Planning URP 6310 3
Urban and Regional Theory URP 6840 3
Urban Design URP 6881 3
Planning Workshop URP 6920 3
Planning Project URP 6979 3

The core component provides planning knowledge, skills and values. Planning knowledge includes: the structure and functions of urban settlements, history and theory of planning processes and practices, and administrative, legal and political aspects of plan-making and policy implementation. Planning skills focus on: problem formulation, research skills and data gathering; quantitative analysis and computers; written, oral and graphic communications; collaborative problem solving, plan-making and program design; and the synthesis and application of knowledge to practice. Discussion of planning values provides students with the basis for becoming ethical practitioners who are aware of, and responsible for, the ways their activities affect and promote societal and individual concerns.

The specializations permit advanced study in planning subfields. Specializations are offered in:

1. Economic Development and Tourism
2. Environmental Planning
3. Sustainable Community Planning
4. Visual Planning Technology

Each specialization is structured to include an introductory course, a methods course and a policy course. Students also have the option of tailoring their own specialization with the approval of the program coordinator.

The synthesis component consists of an individually designed and executed planning project. Students are also expected to gain planning work experience during their program through the Guided Practicum (URP 6945).

Academic Standing
Students are considered to be in good academic standing if they are making satisfactory progress toward the M.U.R.P. degree. Students are expected to maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative average throughout the course of study; failure to maintain this average for two successive semesters will result in automatic dismissal. Only grades of “C” or higher are acceptable in fulfilling the requirements for the M.U.R.P. degree. Students may not graduate with more than one grade below a “B-” in core courses (in such cases, these courses must be repeated for a grade of “B-” or higher).

Acceptance of transfer credits from approved institutions is dependent upon the pertinence of the work to the M.U.R.P. degree requirements. Transfer of credit should normally occur at the time of admission and is limited to 6 credits. Transfer credit can be given only for courses that have not been applied to another degree or preparatory work.

Waivers from specific course (but not the associated credit) requirements may be granted upon approval of the director of the School.

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Certificate Programs

The School offers four certificate programs, which are described below. Certificate students are required to maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average throughout the completion of the certificate. Students cannot complete a certificate program with more than one grade below a “B-”.

Economic Development and Tourism Certificate
This certificate provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to help cities with their built and natural attractions to enhance their revenue base and improve their citizens’ quality of life. The role of the economic development planner today is frequently directed at tourism in the form of urban entertainment centers, reinvigorated downtowns and waterfronts or assessing the potential value to the cost of a convention center or stadium. Urban physical attributes like greenways, urban river trails and parks also provide a base for enhancing economic development while contributing to the area’s quality of life. The certificate program consists of four courses that emphasize the varied inputs to a good economic development plan. The courses are:

Environmental Planning
and Society
URP 6421
Introduction to Economic
Development and Tourism
URP 6540
Urban Revitalization Strategies URP 6545
The Public Sector and Economic
Development Planning
URP 6549

Environmental Planning Certificate
The Environmental Planning certificate program addresses issues related to brownfield redevelopment, water quality and availability and opportunities for improving the quality of life in the urban community. This certificate program is open to anybody with a bachelor’s degree. The program consists of four courses that are all offered at night. The program caters to both local residents and government employees who want to increase their knowledge about the environment. It consists of three required courses and one elective. The three required courses present the history of environmental thinking and sustainable development, introduce students to the science behind environmental issues and cover federal and state environmental policy. The elective can be selected from a wide range of courses taught at FAU.

Environmental Planning and Society URP 6421
Environmental Analysis in Planning URP 6425
Environmental Policy Planning URP 6429
Elective  

Sustainable Community Planning Certificate
This certificate is directed at practicing planners, public administrators, civic leaders and neighborhood activists with social science backgrounds who wish to improve existing skills or gain new skills in reviving urban core areas, encouraging economic development and creating sustainable communities. Community revitalization is a critical element that will ultimately determine how our cities cope with increasing challenges associated with growth and change. The certificate program consists of three required courses covering economic development, environmental planning and site planning, and one elective course. They are:

Environmental Analysis in Planning URP 6425
Urban Revitalization Strategies URP 6545
Site Planning URP 6873
Elective  

Visual Planning Technology Certificate
This four-course certificate program is designed to build working knowledge and skills in understanding, applying and managing geographic information systems (GIS) as well as other visual technologies within the planning environment. It gives students a comprehensive survey of the visual technologies used by public agencies as geographic information for strategic planning and policy formulation. The program also provides hands-on experience with one of the GIS software packages—Environmental Systems Research Institute’s (ESRI) ArchInfo, ArcView, Network Analyst and Spatial Analyst. Visual Planning Technology courses are:

Introduction to GIS in Planning URP 6270
Managing GIS Projects URP 6272
GIS Applications in Planning URP 6277
Elective  


Combined Program

Bachelor of Architecture/Master of Urban and Regional Planning

This degree continuum allows a student interested in architecture and its place in the planning of a city or region to earn a carefully sequenced pair of degrees at the same time. The School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Regional Planning created this sequence by integrating the offerings of two degree programs so that a student can graduate with both a professional B.Arch. degree and a M.U.R.P. degree after six years of full-time study.

The two-degree-combination curriculum is organized in a timeframe where courses for one major will integrate as elective courses in the other. The thesis year combines planning and architecture courses, preparing students to sequence their thesis project for architecture and their final planning course as the culmination of their undergraduate professional degree and their graduate degree in planning.

For admission and degree requirements, refer to the description of this program under the School of Architecture heading in this section.

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Link to Course Descriptions for the College for Design and Social Inquiry